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My Food Job Rocks!

There is very little awareness of what the people in the food industry actually do. This stems back to the lack of knowledge and awareness of the range of degree courses and programs available that will equip them for a career in food. My FoodJobRocks! by Adam Yee is the first podcast of its kind that allows listeners to hear directly from people who are in the food industry and have a passion for what they do. They share how they became involved in food and describe what it is they do, plus a few more fun questions just to keep things entertaining. Listen to them here, and stay tuned for a new episode every Monday.
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Nov 20, 2017

I’m a big fan of interviewing small businesses that are rocking it and Pepper North is no exception.

For one, I can ask them practical questions on how to get started and I get really grounded and tactical answers. Another reason? I get to try their amazing products.

Ana Stevens found me on linkedin and asked to be interviewed. She then sent me some of her amazing products for me to try, big fan of their blueberry barbecue sauce. Canadian listeners, these products are exclusively for you (for now).

So a big thing that really surprised me about Pepper North is that not only is it completely family ran, but they are selling at over 200 stores in the Toronto area. I dive in deep to find out how they try to get their products in stores and I found it really informative.

Other highlights in this episode includes how important a story is on a label, the huge local movement going around in Canada and a great dissection on what makes these two founders such a great team.

About Pepper North

Pepper North was born out of a love for growing super-hot peppers and handcrafting delicious gourmet hot pepper products. We believe in using the freshest locally sourced ingredients possible in order to create a flavour experience that will be enjoyable for all.We are a family run business established in 2013 located in Oshawa, Canada. We began our journey into the hot sauce world much like many others, by growing hot peppers in our home garden and turning them into delicious spicy products for friends and family. As demand began to grow, so did our batch sizes. Adding eye catching labels, we started attending local farmers markets and festivals to rave reviews from our customers and fellow hot sauce lovers. Before long, we were making a name for ourselves across Canada with our line of delicious super-hot sauces.

Currently our award winning hot sauces and condiments are all natural, free from added preservatives, gluten free, and can be found in over 200 stores across Ontario and beyond.

"We are truly excited and humbled to bring great hot sauces and condiments into Canadian households because we put a lot of love, passion & dedication into each hand crafted batch".

Sponsor - FoodGrads

If you are even just a little bit interested in a career in food & beverage, you should join FoodGrads.  It’s an interactive platform where you can hear about different careers, hear from your peers, have a voice and share your story as well as ask specific questions and get feedback from industry experts across the sector.

You can create a profile, add your resume and search for co-op, internships and full time opportunities just for Food Grads. Employers can find you too, they can recruit you for jobs and projects they need help with to give you the relevant industry experience you need.

Join FoodGrads today! Just go to Foodgrads.com

Sponsor - ICON Foods

What’s worse than marketing saying, ‘we have to clean up these sugars?’

They want clean label sugar reduction because that’s the trend.

So I advise you to skate to where the puck is going. Whether it’s to make your product a bit healthier or following the ever-changing FDA laws, my friends at Icon Foods – formerly Steviva Ingredients – are here to help. They have more than 20 years of R&D experience with natural sweeteners and sweetening systems in a wide range of applications. With a product list of twenty different sweeteners and plug-in sweetening systems that keeps growing, you can’t go wrong. Check out stevivaingredients.com to learn about the newest all-natural sweetener solutions and collaboration opportunities.

For more information, visit ICON foods at ICONfoods.com


Episode Highlights

-Why putting a story on your label is really important
-Why controlling everything gives you amazing control
-Why it’s harder to grow Peppers in Canada (duh!)
-The power of local food in Canada
-The power of having a creative and administrative founder
-A discussion on sales
-Why sorting M and Ms

Describe your business in a sentence or less: We produced all natural gourmet hot sauce using locally sourced ingredients
When someone noticed your sauce first, what do they notice specifically?: The labels first because we do our own labels
Romance Panel- describes the panel on a food label
Favorite part about your job: Drew: Creating new sauces. Anna: Build relationships
What was the hardest thing to learn in making your business?: For Ana, learning the different aspects of the food industry
Describes the steps it took to get to where you are today?: Been a long 4 years. Started out selling seeds. People wanted hotter and hotter and we kept on giving them hotter and hotter
Where do you get the peppers?: We grow them ourselves but we supply the farmers the seeds.
How did you grow?: Food and drink shows, fancy food shows, contacting local stores. We are currently in 200 stores.
How do you get into these stores?: Went on Google, typed up specialty food stores, sample to store managers,

You have to be there in person
Do your research! The place has to sell sauces. Call on phone or email them (if they ask)
Ana has a wholesale list that explains the products, ingredients, story, and cost (quantity/case)


Why did you decide to start a food business?: Drew always loved cooking and growing fruits and vegetables. Ana loves interfacing with customers.
Quick Tips: Walt Disney and Roy Disney’s dynamic is the same as Ana and Drew
How do you think of new products?: I think of an idea in bed and create a new product. For example: Blueberry Hot Sauce
My Food Job Rocks: It’s never a dull day. There is something to do every day
Is your product seasonal?: Different SKUs sell more depending on season
Quick Tip: Canadians don’t like pectin
What type of food trends are popular?: Hot sauce is exploding. Fermentation is also growing huge such as Kombucha
One thing you’d like to know more about?: Food Science, shelf-life things, consumer behavior
Quick Tip: A sale 1 to 1 is easy. Selling in a grocery store is really hard because the competition is fierce
How did you get inspired to get into food?: Drew: Mother taught him how to cook, his wife encouraged him to start on his own
Did you quit cold turkey before jumping into business?: No, Drew did things on a  side for the year. Ana went on maternity leave
Favorite Kitchen Item: Slow cooker using Pepper North Sauces. Ana likes to make snacks and whipping up rice krispy squares
Quick Tips: Analyze the ways people cook or eat and notice why they are in the roles they are in,
Favorite Food: Drew makes sandwiches like Philly Cheese Steaks and Pulled Pork Sandwiches. Favorite food is pizza
Starting a Food Business: Ana: Do your research, ask the questions, do the regulations, find the logistics. There’s a lot. Drew: Be prepared that not everyone is going to love what you make.
Do you have any advice for starting a food buisness?: Stay true to yourself and your product and yourself will shine. Just keep going, don’t give up.
Where can we find you guys for advice?: Pepper North. Facebook. Ana is on linkedin

Other Links

Stargazer: 75% all pepper based
7 pot primo – Troy Primo in Louisiana
Fancy Food Show experience
Local in Canada versus local in United States - Half of the people who go up to Drew ask where it’s made
Canada’s maternity leave is a year
Equifruit interview
Use their blueberry sauce on chicken wings and ice cream
Afterglow hot apricot jelly – apricot zuchinni

 

Nov 13, 2017

Weber Stibolt contacted me on our My Food Job Rocks facebook page and I got him on the show.

He is a fanatic in both the coffee realm and the quality realm and I learned a ton about what makes coffee great.

Weber shares his passion for agriculture and food science even sharing how he got into food science and how he’ll be teaching the next generation.

Being of a very technical mindset, you will also learn some amazing things, such as the art of coffee tasting, how to be analytical and critical of your own work, and why communicating with your peers, is the most important skill in the world.

About Weber 

Weber Stibolt is a Quality Assurance Specialist for Eight O’ Clock coffee based in the Washington, D.C. area. Eight O’ Clock is a 150-year-old brand born out of the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company (A&P), a chain of now-defunct supermarkets. When A&P was struggling financially in the early 2000s, the Eight O’ Clock coffee brand was spun off and later purchased by Tata Global Beverages. TGB is a India-based company with a vast array of tea and coffee products under various brands across the world - a perfect fit for a global product like coffee.
 
At Eight O’ Clock Coffee, the three-person quality team oversees the food safety and quality of 20 million pounds of coffee annually. In this role, Weber plays a large part in the day-to-day operations of the facility by monitoring both the coffee and its packaging. He works with the production team, mechanics, and the rest of the management staff by communicating quality updates and addressing issues that may arise. In addition, Weber designs and conducts experiments with the ultimate goal of re-evaluating specifications to make the best finished product possible.
 
Weber’s interests while studying Food Science at the University of Delaware primarily resided in food safety. His collegiate internships working with produce food safety at the farm level have launched him into the role he is in today. He is the Alternate HACCP Coordinator at Eight O’ Clock Coffee and is responsible for many programs that the food safety plan at the facility is built upon.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

If you are even just a little bit interested in a career in food & beverage, you should join FoodGrads.  It’s an interactive platform where you can hear about different careers, hear from your peers, have a voice and share your story as well as ask specific questions and get feedback from industry experts across the sector.

You can create a profile, add your resume and search for co-op, internships and full time opportunities just for Food Grads. Employers can find you too, they can recruit you for jobs and projects they need help with to give you the relevant industry experience you need.

Join FoodGrads today! Just go to Foodgrads.com

Sponsor - ICON Foods

What’s worse than marketing saying, ‘we have to clean up these sugars?’

They want clean label sugar reduction because that’s the trend.

So I advise you to skate to where the puck is going. Whether it’s to make your product a bit healthier or following the ever-changing FDA laws, my friends at Icon Foods – formerly Steviva Ingredients – are here to help. They have more than 20 years of R&D experience with natural sweeteners and sweetening systems in a wide range of applications. With a product list of twenty different sweeteners and plug-in sweetening systems that keeps growing, you can’t go wrong. Check out stevivaingredients.com to learn about the newest all-natural sweetener solutions and collaboration opportunities.

For more information, visit ICON foods at ICONfoods.com

Episode Highlights

-The different Coffee Beans Industry Uses
-How Weber got into food science
-An indepth analysis on how to taste coffee
-Acrylamide in Coffee

Question Summary

Sentence or less: I’m the Willy Wonka of Coffee. I’m a Food Scienitst and work for coffee and I get I’m a Barista
East Coast
What is the Niche for Eight o’ clock coffee?: Our niche is to be decent coffee. McDonalds, Starbucks, Dunkin
Official Job Title: Quality Assurance Specialist – Specifically Packaging, and Food Safety roles
Favorite thing about your job: I like sending great products to people
Quick Tip: In most manufacturing, Production and Quality are in the same vein, in Eight O Clock, we are separate and work cooperatively
How did you get to where you are today?:
University of Delaware had a Food Science Exploration Day at the end of the day, I wanted to go into Food Science
How did you get your first job?:  Maryland isn’t really known for food. Ended up working with a recruiting chose between the West and Maryland
TIC Gums
McCormick
Gardien
Lab Support
What is the most important skill you need for your job?: Being analytical and always question everything. People in quality sometimes get into a rut. You have to analyze even your own work to become better the next day. It’ll help you immensely
How do you quantitatively approve good coffee?: Good seal integrity. We use both tensile strength testing and  people
My Food Job Rocks: It brings me a lot of joy giving out great products to people
Do you drink coffee?: Yes, and I do sensory testing, which I love. Example: Columbia versus Original
Starbucks’s cupping method

The cupping method
Ceramic cup, level out a certain amount of coffee, let it sit, have specialized spoons, and vigourously slurp it up. You have to properly aerate it to get the full flavor of the coffee (like wine). You have to be as obnoxious about slurping as possible

Same thing about Olive oil
What would be your dream job title: Food Scientist for NASA
Food Trends and Technologies: Automation. We have installed 3 new case packers. Machine breakdown sucks
Biggest Problem in the Food Industry: Food Education. More and more people want to know what’s in our food but there’s a lot of misinformation.
Who is doing a good job educating the consumer?: Domino’s Foods. Our farmers know the best for these cows
Trix natural colors switching back to artifical
Coffee complaints: one of my tasks is to review complaints. A lot of people inquire if their coffee is GMO but there’s no such thing as GMO coffee
Quick Tip: You will die faster overdosing on caffeine than acrylamide
Favorite Quote: Insanity is doing something over and over again and expect a different results. For quality, challenge the process.
Is it hard to invoke change in Quality?: Yes, but you should still try to keep on changing things
Favorite Book: The last Lecture by Randy Pausch. Imagineer at Disney Land
Favorite Kitchen Item: Hand blender
Any Advice for Food Industry? Write a good cover letter
What do you think schools should teach you more in the industry?: As someone in quality, I wish I remembered more about statistics. Take writing classes and learn how to communicate effectively. Intro to business class.
Public speaking experience: Adam – Podcasting. Weber – 4H Club

Other Links

University of Delaware
Donuts use Premium Coffee. We use Arabica beans
4H Club- House Program. Weber spent 10 years in the program
Sodium Alginate Beads
Unwrapped
Good Eats
California lawyer wants to label coffee as a carcinogen
Acrylamide

Nov 6, 2017

This title was inspired by this article

If you’re a fan of this podcast, I talk about taco bell a lot and I finally got a chance to talk to the registered dietician from Taco Bell.

And I did not hold back. I talk about pretty much everything from the Naked Chicken Chalupa to the Power Bowl and praised every single item on Taco Bell’s menu. But of course, there’s some takeaways.

One huge thing I want you to notice is how Missy carves her path. After working in 6 months in Taco Bell, she said “I want to own Nutrition in Taco Bell”. Not only that, but she continues to learn how to become a better and better employee by finding mentors in different departments.

Other than that, we’ll talk about how being a dietitian in the fast food industry works, how to customize your taco bell order, and we share our experiences eating Guinea Pig in Peru

About Missy

Missy Schaaphok is the Senior Nutrition Strategist for Taco Bell Corp. spearheading the strategic global efforts for nutrition and product development. Within this role, she is responsible for sensible menu development, regulatory compliance, stakeholder engagement, animal welfare, and sustainability. She works closely with executive, legal, brand marketing, and public relations teams to communicate Taco Bell’s commitment to quality and affordable food experiences.

Missy plays a big role in how Taco Bell creates food that is fun, innovative and craveable, food you want to eat again, and food that fits customers’ evolving lifestyles. She has been the voice in telling Taco Bell’s “food for all” journey while also leading efforts behind the scenes. Most recently, Missy led the development of the Power Menu, a menu featuring high-protein bowls and burritos under 510 calories. She is also the driving force behind the brand’s commitment to simplify its ingredients, reducing sodium across the menu and removing artificial flavors and colors, high fructose corn syrup, partially hydrogenated oil and unsustainable palm oil; bringing customers a vegetarian menu certified by the American Vegetarian Association – the first of its kind in the Quick Service Restaurant industry, and leading the switch to cage-free eggs and serving chicken raised without antibiotics important to human medicine, in all U.S. restaurants.

Missy has been recognized for her leadership serving on expert panels and presenting at key industry events like World of Healthy Flavors, Healthy Menu Collaborative, Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior, National Restaurant Association and California Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. While working at WIC, she wrote and published her first cookbook titled, WIC Tested, Dietitian Approved. Since then she has contributed to the book on Recipe Nutrient Analysis: Best Practices for Calculations for Chemical Analysis and co-authored, “Uniform National Menu Labeling: Review of the Regulation and the RDN’s Role in Effective Implementation" for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Food & Culinary Practice Group.

Missy is a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, currently serving as the Chair-Elect for the Dietitians in Business and Communications Dietetic Practice Group. She also holds volunteer positions within the National Restaurant Association's Nutrition Executive Study Group and The Culinary Institute of America’s Healthy Menu Collaborative Protein Working Group.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

If you are even just a little bit interested in a career in food & beverage, you should join FoodGrads.  It’s an interactive platform where you can hear about different careers, hear from your peers, have a voice and share your story as well as ask specific questions and get feedback from industry experts across the sector.

You can create a profile, add your resume and search for co-op, internships and full time opportunities just for Food Grads. Employers can find you too, they can recruit you for jobs and projects they need help with to give you the relevant industry experience you need.

Join FoodGrads today! Just go to Foodgrads.com

Sponsor - ICON Foods

Big announcement from our friends at Stevivia. They now go by ICON Foods and you’re seeing a rebranding in action which I find really exciting. Their vision is brighter, their strategy is stronger and their all-natural, clean-label product portfolio is ever growing. So why are they doing this? Even though stevia is an amazing product, there are just so many sweeteners coming up and it’s becoming a bit overwhelming.

Monkfruit, Allulose, Agave, you name it. This is what ICON Foods is here for: to help you find sweetener solutions so you can focus on other challenges in the product development process.

For more information, visit ICON foods at ICONfoods.com

Episode Highlights

  • How Missy developed the Power Menu
  • 70% of our businesses is in our drive-thru
  • The challenges to super innovative things like chicken chulupa
  • Important skills you need to be an amazing product developer
  • Missy and Adam compare notes on how Peruvian Guinea Pig tastes like

Question Summary

When someone asks what you do for a living, what do you tell them?: I’m a Dietician….from Taco Bell
Best thing about your job: Eating taco bell every day
Soup’d Up Bean Burrito Custom Recipe: Bean Burrito+ Cheese + Pico De Gallo + Grill it + Diablo Sauce
Feed Articles on the taco bell website: How to hack taco bell. Vegan, healthy, etc
Dietetic Internship: super competitive and grueling
How did you got to Taco Bell?: Once was a Food Science Product Development Rubio’s Intern. Past Coworker from Rubio’s told me to apply
6 months into the job: “I want to own Nutrition in Taco Bell”
How do you deliver amazing taste but healthy?: We are still trying to figure it out
What is the most important skill you need?: A science foundation and how to convince people without scientific knowledge that what you’re doing is the right thing to do
Do you feel stigmatized from other dieticians from working in the fast food industry?: I understand, but I stand for my company. I’m doing great things at taco bell. For example, 46 million people a week, reducing sodium means I am reducing millions of pounds of salts
My Food Job Rocks: I’m the dietitian in Taco Bell
What type of food trends and technologies are you really excited about?: The plant forward trend
Do our beans have lard?: No! They are actually certified vegan
Mobile Ordering, online ordering, menu boards: You can showcase individual ingredients
You can sub black beans and romaine lettuce
Make it Fresco
Taco Bell needs to be mainstream and Mexican and they use beans as their plant forward options
The biggest challenge the food industry needs to face?: There is a lot of problems.
Reducing sodium but sodium is very functional (taste and preservation)
Animal Welfare and sustainability
In terms of corporate decisions, what makes a company decide to commit to health?: The consumers are the ones who have a say. We want to reduce sodium.
Taco Bell will reduce sodium by 10%
We eliminated the 40 oz soda (800 million grams of sugar from consumer’s diets)
Hidden Skills: Quantifying your impact
Press Release: Taco Bell New Years Resolutions
What’s one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: Finance and numbers. how commodities can change instantly and how big investments change finance
I seek out mentors: I meet monthly with a finance mentor
Who inspired you to get into food?: My mom inspired me. She had Missy and her brother to make dinner once a week.
Favorite Quote: Eat well, Travel Often
First Travel adventure in Europe – I found France to be the most unique. We dug for clams
Weirdest food I’ve eaten: Guenia Pig in Peru
Any advice in getting into the food industry?: Dietitians ask me this. It’s networking and who you know. If you’re just starting out, just start volunteering at anything food related
What is one thing you’d like to dispel about the food industry?: There is a dietician in every food establishment so there is always someone fighting for nutrition.
Where can we find you?: I’m the only Schaaphok in the world. Also in @workoutwithali

Other Links

The power menu bowl
Quest
RDN – Registered Dietician
San Diego State University - Food and Nutritional Science
Glanbia Foods
Jessica Gavin Episode
Article about Suddenly becoming the Healthiest Fast Food Chain
Naked Chicken Chalupa
Chick-Fil-Le – Free breakfast when they download the app
Clean Meat – Lab Grown Meat
Taco Bell Cantina

Oct 31, 2017

In the past couple of months, students and professionals have contacted me all over the country to ask for advice on how to apply their degree in food science. I answer via linkedin message, email, phone calls, or sometimes, even skype. Most students are scared to have their interview posted in public, but one rose up to the challenge.

Undergraduate Kelly Pan from the Ohio State University has reached out and asked for advice and I answer the best I can.

A common theme in this episode is that we get into how to find out what you really like and turn it into a paid profession. We also talk a lot about the value in classes and going above and beyond.

Important lesson is that schools will give you a baseline knowledge pool but won’t really teach you much about industry until you get into industry, whether that’s a problem or not, nothing I can do about it, but it’s just something to be aware of.

No ads this time, this one’s a freebie

How did you find us?: professors forwarded your podcast email to us
The Ohio State
How to Get Involved in College/ Making College Worth It
Product Development Info meeting
Smart Snacks
Why did you choose food science as your calling?: I liked food and cooking but I had good grades so I decided to go to college. I googled food and science and got food science.
The many jobs of food science
How Kelly found her interest through this interview
What do you think you’re good at?:
Wrong question
What do you do in the spare time?: I like to look at where food is placed in the grocery isles
Food Marketing
Mintel
Market Research
What kind of podcasts do you listen to?: Mental Health Podcasts
Nutraceutical
Ingredient suppliers hire people fresh out of college to apply their ingredients
Refractometery
Why pH is important: Student perspective versus Industry
Schools teach you how something works, but not why it works
Get a job on campus as a production assistant or research assistant
How to talk to your professor: research them and talk to them about your research and try and get a job from it
My favorite classes: Did not like food safety, loved food chemistry once you understand the proper biochemistry
Food Engineering vs Food Science
Food Engineering: Using engineering concepts for processing systems
Beyond Meat Episode
Texas A and M Extrusion
If you graduated, did you think this would be where you are now?: Not during my first job, but now, maybe
Louis Edmond Episode
Pre-Vets likely go to Meat Science
How to hedge your bets for a job: meet more people, do a lot of networking and leadership role
Are you happy where you are Adam?: I am very fortunate
Where do you see yourself in 5 years?: You never really know

Oct 30, 2017

This is a special episode where I’ve had the opportunity for some students to ask me some questions. I’ve had many, but I chose these two episodes as great examples of the advice I give to students.

So first up is Weslie Khoo, a PhD student who wants to know more about Product Developemnt and stuff like that. I do my best answering them and talk about my experience, but also name dropping a lot of companies that I found

If you guys have any problems with the audio, let me know. Weslie’s audio is a bit hard to listen to, and if it bothers you, let me know through podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com or linkedin. I’ll have a replacement episode with my audio switched out.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

If you are even just a little bit interested in a career in food & beverage, you should join FoodGrads.  It’s an interactive platform where you can hear about different careers, hear from your peers, have a voice and share your story as well as ask specific questions and get feedback from industry experts across the sector.

You can create a profile, add your resume and search for co-op, internships and full time opportunities just for Food Grads. Employers can find you too, they can recruit you for jobs and projects they need help with to give you the relevant industry experience you need.

Join FoodGrads today! Just go to Foodgrads.com

Sponsor - ICON Foods

Big announcement from our friends at Stevivia. They now go by ICON Foods and you’re seeing a rebranding in action which I find really exciting. Their vision is brighter, their strategy is stronger and their all-natural, clean-label product portfolio is ever growing. So why are they doing this? Even though stevia is an amazing product, there are just so many sweeteners coming up and it’s becoming a bit overwhelming.

Monkfruit, Allulose, Agave, you name it. This is what ICON Foods is here for: to help you find sweetener solutions so you can focus on other challenges in the product development process.

For more information, visit ICON foods at ICONfoods.com

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Questions Asked

After you test flavors, do you launch all at once or one at a time?
How startups can collect market research
When am I sharing too much information before launch?
Why would you go with a copacker?
How to find copackers?
Why do grocery stores private label?
Do you argue a lot with copackers?
Is there anything between a copacker and a incubator?
What is a Pilot?
How to get Packaging
What startup resources do you like?
How do you get a product out there?

Question Summary

Just collect data for sensory. More data the better
How do you know a product is good? Seth Godin: If ten people tell ten friends about your product, it’s a good product
Am I sharing too much information before launch?: You should be as transparent as possible, because people want transparency. If you put in more effort, then most people won’t copy you until you get big
Legal disputes can be important regarding how products work
Why would you go with a copacker?: Upfront cost of manufacturing is huge
When do you engage with a co-packer?: When you validate your product will work. One example is getting Whole Foods to demand your product, then you need to get product fast
Cottage Industry Permit
How to find copackers?: Word of Mouth, Google, some websites do this, Copacker websites suck, go to trade shows, Private Label Manufacturer Association, also friends with someone who sells a lot of things, any book that talks about making your own product
Why do grocery stores private label?: It gives higher margins
Do you argue a lot with copackers?: Yes, but you have to be competent
Is there anything between a copacker and a incubator?: Commercial kitchen or your basement
How to get Packaging: Ask the copacker to see what they recommend. Also go to Pac Expo
How do you get a product out there?: You have to go there and talk to people. Who you’re targeting, why, what they really want
Give away your product for free
Taste wins, having it healthy is better
You can have a bad tasting product, and be healthy, and it will sell, but you won’t be the best
The best Food Scientist have a mix of science or art, and it’s the consumer opinion that matters
What startup resources do you like?: Good Food, Great Buisnesses, Conferences, Fancy Food Show

Other Links

Examples of strategic market launches
Halo Top
Taco Bell

The first "health" bar
Hershey Chocolate Bar

Examples of Target Marketing
Niching – Super specifying your target market
Paleo bar – I should only focus on paleo people, nothing else matters
Keto bar
Quest Bars
Soylent
Hampton Creek
Beyond Meat
Airbnb

Examples of startup research
Susie Wyshak – Good Food Great Buisness
Fancy Food Show
The Lean Startup by Eric Ries

Who Private Labels?
Private Label vs Contract Manufacturing
Costco
Safeway
Target
CVS

 

Oct 23, 2017

I’m a big fan of talking to product developers because the more and more I talk to them, I realize they have the same problems I do! Sure maybe it’s rice, or gummies, or jerky, but once you realize the common thread of dealing with people, it makes it a lot easier to ask for advice.

And that’s kind of the commonality in this episode. I exchange with Brian all sorts of helpful product development tips such as who to ask for help when you can’t figure out something out, or advice on how to get internships. By the way, you’ll also find out in the interview, that I totally forgot that Hershey bought out Krave.

We even get into a good discussion on eating protein and the beauty of bone marrow.

About Brian

Brian Gouldsbury is a Senior Food Scientist for Krave Pure Foods, a subsidiary of The Hershey Company. Brian’s role is to develop new jerky flavors and meat snacks for Krave, in addition to identifying margin expansion opportunities for the brand. Brian has an associates degree in culinary arts from The Culinary Institute of America, and a bachelors in food science from Cornell University. While working for Hershey, he also obtained his MBA from Penn State University, and most recently an advanced certificate in management and leadership from MIT Sloan. In his spare time, Brian is an avid bodybuilder, and has competed in several state level competitions. He is also a life learner, and is currently attempting to teach himself Mandarin when he is not chasing his two year old son around the house. 

Key Takeaways

  • Adam didn’t know Krave was bought by Hershey
  • How acquisitions work with Hershey
  • Can you run all meats on the same line? Yes
  • How Brian and I found food science
  • Brian’s theory on gaining muscle
  • Would vegetarians eat meat?

Question Summary

What do you do: My job is to make X or Y
First Job: Margin Expansion. Using cheaper products with no drawbacks from the consumer ends
Krave ideation to commercialization: 9 months to commercialize
Hershey ideation to commercialization: 1 to 2 years
Hershey and Krave can move launch dates. Isagenix can’t
Best thing about Krave: It’s the people. It’s small and interactive and in California. I love interacting with all sorts of people
Steps in Brian’s career: Culinary Institute after highschool, Chef life was brutal for Brian and he wanted a work life balance, found out what a food scientist was, Cornell University BS, hired on for Hershey, moved to Krave
Certifed Research Chefs
What is the most important skill that you need for your job?: When it’s ok to ask for help
How do you ask for help?: Internal subject matter experts and the secret mad scientist in Hershey
How Adam does it: talk to copacker technologists; think of your production staff
My Food Job Rocks: I love working with people and I love protein
Brian’s philosophy on protein: eat a lot of protein. Some people eat 5 grams of protein
Dream Job Title: VP of R+D or Supply Chain
What do you look for most in a job?: If you don’t like what you do, it becomes a chore. Also, companies who give back
Food Trends and Technology: Synthetic meat production and bug protein
Who inspired you to get into food?: My mother, I accidentally snorted cayenne pepper as a kid
Favorite Book: Financial Accounting for Internal Decision Making
I’m teaching myself Mandarin Chinese
Article about someone overloading on protein
Kitchen item: the chef knife
Best thing I ever ate: Roasted Bone Marrow: Blue Ribbon Brassiere. It’s delicious
Best piece of advice in the food industry: Internships, internships, internships. Define what niche you fit in, best way you can get this is internships
How do you recommend people getting their first internship: Walk into a career fair and get ready to go. Dress to impress
Brian’s first internship: it was actually Hershey!
Adam’s first internship: A slaughterhouse
What would you tell yourself the first day of your job?:  Just have fun. Don’t take yourself so seriously
How do you want people to contact you?: Linkedin. Brian Goldsbury

Other Links

Article about someone overloading on protein and dying
CSR – Corporate Social Responsibility
Project Peanutbutter
EXO
Bitty foods
Brandy and Bone Marrow

Oct 16, 2017

If you want to know ALL ABOUT CROWDFUNDING, you must listen to this episode.

Let me introduce you to Cheryl Clements, one of the most delightful people I’ve ever interviewed. She owns the startup, Pie Shell, which helps food startups raise capital using crowdfunding.

What makes Pieshell a unique crowdfunding platform is that it is super focused on food. All they fund is food companies but more importantly, they help food companies prepare to get ready for the crowdfunding journey.

So this episode is jam packed with so many tips on how to name a company, how to ask for help, and how to most importantly, raise money to achieve your dream.

Pieshell is currently in a crowdfunding stage itself and here's how you can be part of the pie.

How to invest into the early stages of Pieshell. All you have to do is go to https://www.seedinvest.com/pieshell/seed and invest at minimum, $500 dollars. After I edited the interview, I hopped on and invested and this is not because they are my friends or anything, but it’s because I really believe in pieshell’s mission, and I hope after this episode, you do too.

Crowd Funding Statistics

  • Why 75% of food startups fail
  • Why it takes 3-4 months to prepare for a crowdfunding campaign and how PieShell prepares for this and gives you tools for success
  • 1 spelling mistake can reduce funding by 13%
  • Venture Capitalist will only work with Food companies that make 1 million to 3 million
  • 85% of people in Expo West will not be there next year

Question Summary

When someone asks what you do for a living, what do you tell them?: I help make people’s dream come true. We are building a community of food entrepreneurs and businessmen
How did PieShell get its name?: It was actually my mom’s company. People loved it.
What the best thing about your job?: Working with all of the projects
How PieShell gets founders: People find us all over the internet. We also have over 60 community partnerships who send us people.
How did you learn about crowdfunding?: I did a lot of homework. And then I crowdfunded to start pieshell. I made $13,000 dollars from that crowdfunding campaign
The steps to get to where you are today: I’ve been in a family who loves food. I spent a lot of time installing SAP to businesses, Cheryl understands process and can translate it to many fields.
How did you reach out to mentors?: You have to be brave. You have to be open to building relationships,
Charming robot web design – met through an internship
One tip on networking: Talk to everyone. Don’t be shy. You need to be talking about yourself all the time. You never know who will show up.
Why Does Your Food Job Rock?: I do what I love everyday. I love helping people.
Food Trends and Technology: People really want to know where things are coming from. Transparency in the market place.
What companies are being transparent?: A lot of smaller companies. However, the bigger companies are doing wonders like Unilever and Chobani
What’s one of the biggest challenge the food industry needs to face?: People don’t understand how much money and time goes into food. It takes 3 to 5 years for a food company to get established.

Other Links

Foodgrads
Barnraising
Kelp Jerky
Fund-a-feast
Ripe.io - Blockchain Technology
SAP
Adam Simon – Head of innovative brands in Clorox
Austin’s Underdogs  - Pieshell
New Equity Crowdfunding Law

Oct 9, 2017

 

I think this might actually be our first quality manager on our podcast and I am very excited that it’s Bryan. He’s had over 25 years working as a Quality expert in the dairy industry.

Bryan is also offering his new book: The New Manager Mindset to our viewers and all you have to do is go to fsmaexpert.com and just pay for shipping. I read this book, as I’m thinking of management, and it really gave me some great tips and resources to not only understand people, but to build systems.

We go pretty in depth on food safety, quality, leadership and management so if you are interested in this pathway, pay close attention to this interview. My favorite part of this interview is about 20 minutes in where Bryan explains how to have everyone agree on how to deal with warm milk.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

If you are even just a little bit interested in a career in food & beverage, you should join FoodGrads.  It’s an interactive platform where you can hear about different careers, hear from your peers, have a voice and share your story as well as ask specific questions and get feedback from industry experts across the sector.

You can create a profile, add your resume and search for co-op, internships and full time opportunities just for Food Grads. Employers can find you too, they can recruit you for jobs and projects they need help with to give you the relevant industry experience you need.

Join FoodGrads today! Just go to Foodgrads.com

Sponsor - ICON Foods

Big announcement from our friends at Stevivia. They now go by ICON Foods and you’re seeing a rebranding in action which I find really exciting. Their vision is brighter, their strategy is stronger and their all-natural, clean-label product portfolio is ever growing. So why are they doing this? Even though stevia is an amazing product, there are just so many sweeteners coming up and it’s becoming a bit overwhelming.

Monkfruit, Allulose, Agave, you name it. This is what ICON Foods is here for: to help you find sweetener solutions so you can focus on other challenges in the product development process.

For more information, visit ICON foods at ICONfoods.com

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • How mentorship brought Bryan to success
  • Why hiring a consultant is a good idea (especially in growth phase), and when to focus on it
  • A really good example of how quality and production can work together (20:00)
  • How to use personality subsets to work together
  • How the FDA works and how to take advantage of it

Question Summary

How do you introduce yourself: I make sure your food is up to standard (Quality) and make it safe (Food Safety)
Quality is making things consistent, Food Safety needs to be in place
What do you do?: I’m a quality consultant
What’s the best thing about your job?: I love working with different companies
Steps it took to get to where you are today: Planned to go to medical school, ended up working in cheese, had to decide between contributor to manager
If you want to make a bigger impact, you might need to be a manager
A quality manager’s job: to find out why stuff is happening, not fix things right away

How to create a great quality system
- Examine a process
- Talk to the worker
- Determine the key attributes
- Develop a buffer (red light, yellow light, green light) that production can understand
- Make smart decisison on a yellow light situation

Best skill you can have in quality: Technical competency and the ability to talk to people
How do you do better at talking to people?: See if you can find a person’s philosophy and how they view things. Then communicate in a way they relate to it.
Managing versus Leadership: You need both, but leadership is a focus on creating new leaders and trusting people to do their job
Exciting Food Technology: Blockchain as a tracking mechanism for food
Biggest Issue: FDA will eventually target corporate headquarters. Most corporate HQs don’t have systems in place
What’s one thing you’d like to know about?: To keep updated on food safety
How do you keep up to date?: GMA through Smart Brief, Bill Marler Food Safety News Report, take the info and cut and paste
Favorite Kitchen Item: My mom’s ice cream scoop
Best thing you’ve ever eaten: a 7 course meal in Copenhagen, Denmark. Michelien Restaurant
Advice for people in the quality realm?: Gather up your technical skillset and find things that really exciting
If you were to teach something to a class in college, what would you teach?: How to understand the consumer. (found in his book). You shouldn’t base your opinion on CEO feedback, but fanatic customer feedback.
Food Leadership Group.com
Bryan’s Book is available for free. FSMAexpert.com. Book a 30 minute convo

Other Links

Marajuana business in Colorado
Boulder Colorado
Naturally Boulder
Leprino Foods
Class 1 FDA sample
ENTP
ISTJ
Darin Detwiler
Frank Yannis at Walmart -Walmart is partnering with IBM to blockchain
CRISPR
Whole Genome Technology
Gary Danko

Oct 2, 2017

As the title says, this is another Food Safety Fanatic that I just loved talking to! Still young in his career, Ben Chapman does so many things in his field such as being a professor, writing on a blog, and of course, co-hosting a podcast with our previous guest, Don Schaffner.

Ben’s focus on food safety is on the food service side as a lot of his work deal with how to have chefs and other people in the food service industry work with food safety, that not only includes teaching, but he also gives people the tools, whether gaget-like or not to mitigate the complex world of food microorganisms.

Other than that you’ll get a lot of great food safety resources, a great discussion of how food safety is portrayed in the media, and where Ben takes his kids when they grocery shops.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

If you are even just a little bit interested in a career in food & beverage, you should join FoodGrads.  It’s an interactive platform where you can hear about different careers, hear from your peers, have a voice and share your story as well as ask specific questions and get feedback from industry experts across the sector.

You can create a profile, add your resume and search for co-op, internships and full time opportunities just for Food Grads. Employers can find you too, they can recruit you for jobs and projects they need help with to give you the relevant industry experience you need.

Join FoodGrads today! Just go to Foodgrads.com

Sponsor - Steviva Ingredients

Has marketing ever asked you to pull a rabbit out of a hat? I know they have with me. They want clean-label sugar reduction because that’s the trend. And in addition to clean label, we need to follow the ever-changing FDA laws, meet low cost parameters AND create a product that tastes EXCELLENT – with no aftertaste issues.

They want us to make magic happen.

Who do they think we are - Houdini?

Let me tell you who the real magicians are. Steviva Ingredients. Steviva has more than two decades of experience in R&D and clean-label sugar reduction in a variety of applications: beverage, baked goods, fillings, frostings, condiments. Give em a call. They’ll create a solution for you. If they can help me, they can help you. Go check them out at stevivaingredients.com.

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • How I got my butt kicked my freshman year in college
  • The hidden benefits of podcasting when you’re in conferences
  • How I read Ben’s article before I even knew about it

What do you do?: I spend time making people less sick. I give people tools for people to not get sick
What do you do if I know a little about the food industry?: Give resources to food production or consumer;s homes to help them find food borne illnesses.

4 reasons why people get sick:

Handwashing and poor personal hygiene
Cross contamination
Temperature – improper cooking
Storage temperature

These are generally poor decisions. We help track them

What’s the best thing you do for your job?: We have the opportunity to make a difference. If it stops people from getting sick, it’s worth it.
How did you get to where you are?: In high school, I was super interested in microbiology and diseases. Got a summer job in food safety. Masters degree on keeping salmonella off of tomato’s. PhD thesis:  How much handwashing it takes to get rid of bacteria. Applied to NC State. Been there for 9 years.
What do you teach students?: I mentor graduate students, give them the skills to ask food safety questions
What type of skillset or personality do you need to be good at your job?: Being inquisitive and critical. Critical of others work and your own work. In science, we have peer review and we have to be critical
How did food safety talks start?: I was a graduate school student and I met Don. I got Don to speak at a freshman class and I had to have him stay at my house. Don and Ben signed up for Storycore to talk about Food Safety, and Don kept on inviting Ben to be a panelist and then decided to make a podcast.
How do you make your podcast enticing to viewers?: We’ve noticed the least prepared you are, the better your episode might be
What makes a Good Podcast: Excellent Story-tellers, they can paint a picture of what’s going on, and harmony between guests. The best podcasts is where we’re sitting on a bar, drinking a beer
What kind of Podcasts do you listen to?:
Bill Simmons Podcast (BS report).
5x5 podcasts. Back to work - Dan Benjamin.
John Roderick - Roderick on the line.
Pod Save America.
I recommend: Stuff you should know
Barfblog: Most memorable article. Michael Jordan Flu game was linked to bad pizza. Barfblog used to be a forum for people to talk about food poisoning. When we launched, nobody did it, so we did it.
Since you have kids, where do you shop?: Everywhere. My kid loves to shop and we go pretty much everywhere. Ben knows a lot of people in the grocery industry and can text them to see what’s up.
What type of food trends and technology are really interesting you right now?: Chefs are becoming more aware and appreciative of people in Food Safety
Why are food safety outbreaks showing up more? Is it just me?: Media now has more space because it’s online now. Foodborne outbreaks makes great stories. More conversations about food safety are good.
Chipotle Outbreak analysis: Foodborne outbreaks are scars for life. Chipotle hasn’t done a good job sharing information
BBC’s article: 2 years ago. We actually get norovirus outbreaks every day
What’s one thing about the food industry you’d like to know more about?: the food industry does a really good job when saying food safety is a priority. However, I’d like to know more about the process for food safety and how people make decisions day in and day out. We don’t do a  good job saying things aren’t perfect.
Favorite book?: Vivian Howard, North Carolina Chef Deep Run Roots: My Favorite Recipes from the South. TV show: A chef’s life
Favorite Kitchen Items: Thermometer. Cobart PDP 300 Digital Instaread thermometer. Only $20 dollars
Any advice for anyone going into the food industry: Don’t do anything unless you’re passionate about i. There are a lot of jobs in the food industry, and it’s growing in food safety
Find Ben at: Barfblog, Food Safety Talk, 
Twitter: @benjaminchapman,
Instagram: @barfblogben

Links

International Association for Food Protection
Collard Greens
Norovirus
Bluebell Outbreak
Chipotle Outbreak
Peanut Butter Outbreak
Peanut butter Outbreak in Australia

Sep 25, 2017

Dr. Don Schaffner is an amazing food safety scientist who’s the best in class. In fact, let me name youa  few of his amazing awards: You can read his amazing biography here

What’s also super cool, is that Don and his co-host Ben do a whole lot of extracurricular activities to promote food safety and one of their favorite things to do is podcasting. For over 4 years, they’re been doing discussions of food safety and post them online for everyone to enjoy and they do have quite a following.

If you are in food safety or are considering food safety, you have to listen to this interview. Don gives you valuable advice on how to really be a star player in food safety and some amazing resources such as Barfblog, Food Safety News, and the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports

About Don

Dr. Donald W. Schaffner is Extension Specialist in Food Science and Distinguished Professor at Rutgers University. He has authored more than 150 peer-reviewed publications and educated thousands of Food Industry professionals through short courses and workshops in the United States and around the world.

He is a Fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists and the American Academy of Microbiology. He has served as an Editor for the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology since 2005.  Dr. Schaffner was the president of the International Association for Food Protection in 2013-2014. In his spare time he co-hosts a food safety podcast at foodsafetytalk.com.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Sponsor - Steviva Ingredients

Has marketing ever asked you to pull a rabbit out of a hat? I know they have with me. They want clean-label sugar reduction because that’s the trend. And in addition to clean label, we need to follow the ever-changing FDA laws, meet low cost parameters AND create a product that tastes EXCELLENT – with no aftertaste issues.

They want us to make magic happen.

Who do they think we are - Houdini?

Let me tell you who the real magicians are. Steviva Ingredients. Steviva has more than two decades of experience in R&D and clean-label sugar reduction in a variety of applications: beverage, baked goods, fillings, frostings, condiments. Give em a call. They’ll create a solution for you. If they can help me, they can help you. Go check them out at stevivaingredients.com.

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • What is an extension specialist? What are extensions?
  • If you want a career in food science, think about Food Science and Quality because boy we have a lot to do
  • How Don met Darin Detwiler

Official Job title: Distinguished Professor – Distinguished Professor and Extension Specialist
How long have you worked in Rutgers?: Over 25 years!
Extension course: they’ve always existed, but not widely visible
What’s the best skill can you have in Food Safety and Quality: You need to keep learning. The knowledge you have today will be outdated by next year
Don’t think what you know today is going to necessarily be known tomorrow. You always have to keep up with new outbreaks and keep on changing your mind
What resources do you use to keep you up to date?: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports published by the CDC
Barfblog: Doug Powell and Ben Chapman. What’s making people barf!
Food Safety News by Bill Marler
Food Safety Talk with Ben Chapman. 2 PhDs in Food Safety talk about food safety. A director’s commentary of what’s in the food safety news
How did Food Safety Talks start?:
Howard Stern Terrestrial Radio
100th anniversary of IAFP. NPR people came over and Don met Ben and then they talked and then they made a podcast
Dan Benjamin: 5 by 5. How to do podcasting articles
How long has Food Safety Talks been on?: 5 years!
Why Does Your Food Job Rocks?: I love everything about my job. (Literally everything)
What advice can you give a 24 year old on having the achievements that you have?: Give it time, You don’t get ahead on focusing on regrets on the past. It’s just not relevant
Don’t focus on the past, focus on the present. Don’t let setbacks set you back.
Food Technology: Whole Genome Technology. The radar the CDC is using is getting more sensitive. Also, mimicking norovirus
What do you think the biggest challenge the food industry has to face?: Integration of FSMA
What’s one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: Why people aren’t complying to rules
Favorite Quote: Prediction is very difficult especially about the future.
Favorite Book: DiscWorld by Terry Prachett
Favorite Kitchen Item: Digital Scale
What kind of advice would you give a fresh graduate?: Do the right thing. Life is too short that don’t take food safety and quality seriously.
Where can we find you?: Food Safety Talk podcast. Don Schaffner from Rutgers. Bug Counter on twitter. Emails (don’t do emails)

Other Links

Penn State Ice Cream Course
Texas A and M Extrusion Course
Better Process Control Course
Cyclospora
Norovirus
Preventative Controls Rule: a training is required
Produce Safety Rule
Supplier Verification Programs
Irrigation of Water Provisions of the fresh produce rule
Foreign Supplier Training
University of Georgia
American Greed: Peanut Corporation
Story Core (never launched, but we have them at Food Safety Talks)
Dr. Darin Detwiler
FSMA webinars

Sep 18, 2017

This episode is a bit different, and it acts more of a conversation, but it’s a darn good conversation. I met Ronald talking on Shapr, a swipy-like app for business people and just to let you know, I get a lot more meetings on Shapr than the other ones and they’re productive as well.

Ronald has been on TEDEx, he was an ex-magician, has done several media expenditures, web design work, and has a huge passion and curiosity in food

So we talk a lot of cool stuff about food, but also take this as just a casual talk with two very creative people. We try and understand each other, and we do quite well I’d say. Think of this episode a bit differently, not just about the job Ronald has, but also his mindset, or his ability to create, pivot, and entertain.

I’m excited for what Ronald has in stock for us and I hope after your interview, you do too.

About Ronald

Food tech entrepreneur.
Online Marketing and Launch Event Specialist & Amateur Magician. ;)

Former Creative Marketing Strategist for The Red Group, LLC.

In my consulting efforts I helped build brands online. More specifically, I consulted companies and coached experts on how to get started in creating their following online through education based marketing.

Some past projects include TEDxCalicoCanyon, MagicMez, The Last Formula, and most recently The Foodbox.

I've been given the opportunity to work with some amazing people over the years. If you'd like to contact me, please don't hesitate to reach out.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Sponsor - Steviva Ingredients

Has marketing ever asked you to pull a rabbit out of a hat? I know they have with me. They want clean-label sugar reduction because that’s the trend. And in addition to clean label, we need to follow the ever-changing FDA laws, meet low cost parameters AND create a product that tastes EXCELLENT – with no aftertaste issues.

They want us to make magic happen.

Who do they think we are - Houdini?

Let me tell you who the real magicians are. Steviva Ingredients. Steviva has more than two decades of experience in R&D and clean-label sugar reduction in a variety of applications: beverage, baked goods, fillings, frostings, condiments. Give em a call. They’ll create a solution for you. If they can help me, they can help you. Go check them out at stevivaingredients.com.

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • Ronald and Adam’s connection to San Luis Obispo
  • Two tribes in the world of eating: Live to eat, and eat to live
  • The twists and turns for Foodbox
  • Why food farmers are switching to growing more "special" crops

Question Summary

What is Foodbox.tv: We took a pivot and will be focusing on telling the stories and technologies of local food
TEDex: Ronald presented at TedEx: Calico Canyon the Human Connection
What has magic taught you?: Magic taught me to learn fast. Magic shows a raw emotion that we don’t see often. Magic violates a preconceived notion
Favorite Quote: Pain of regret weighs ton, while the pain of discipline weighs ounces
Do you have any advice for people who want to do what you do?: You have to love what you do, but you have to be strategic
Where can we find you?: fdbx.tv

Other Links

TEDEx
Runa
Free Conference Call
Shapr
University Las Vegas
San Luis Obispo
Cal Poly
The Restaurant Coach
Blue Apron
Plated
Soylent
Meal Replacement
Ketosis Diet
1000 True Fans Articles
Book: Sapiens
Book: Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation
The Magician’s Code – Kindle book
Vegan Wrestler makes vegan stuff in Arizona
Singh Farms and Meadows
Sous Vide Marajuana Herb Water
Growth Mindset
Luck + Preparedness = Success

 

Sep 11, 2017

Anton found me randomly through linkedin, found my website, and scheduled an interview all in a span in 2 weeks. Oh, did I mention he’s from Israel?

It was absolutely amazing talking to someone my age from across the country and learning about the differences and similarities between how the food industry works. You’ll learn a little bit about the pros and cons of the Israeli university system, a lot about the daily life of a food engineer, and why Israeli's love guacamole.

About Anton

Anton Slavkin is a cheese product development engineer in the Israeli company Strauss Group.

He has worked as a krill oil extraction process engineer in the nutraceuticals company Enzymotec Ltd and as a chocolate and cereal snacks product development engineer in Unilever Israel.

He earned his B.Sc. in Biotechnology and Food Engineering from IIT (Israel Institute of Technology – The Technion).

In his spare time, he enjoys playing the guitar, inventing new homemade recipes (a.k.a cooking) and hiking.

Anton is passionate about making our world a better place by promoting environmental awareness and using current research data for the development of better products.

About Strauss Group

Strauss Group is an international Food & Beverage company that strives to improve people's lives, headquartered in Israel, where we are the largest food company. The company's portfolio includes four businesses: Strauss Coffee B.V., Strauss Israel, Strauss Water, and PepsiCo – Strauss Fresh Dips & Spreads International aligned with two global consumer trends: Health & Wellness and Fun & Indulgence.

Strauss Group is active in 20 countries worldwide in our diverse fields of activity through partnerships with multinationals. The company brings its know-how in Coffee, Water, Chocolate, Dips & Spreads to diverse markets and cultures, making them accessible to people just the way they like them, adapted to local tastes and habits.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Sponsor - Steviva Ingredients

Has marketing ever asked you to pull a rabbit out of a hat? I know they have with me. They want clean-label sugar reduction because that’s the trend. And in addition to clean label, we need to follow the ever-changing FDA laws, meet low cost parameters AND create a product that tastes EXCELLENT – with no aftertaste issues.

They want us to make magic happen.

Who do they think we are - Houdini?

Let me tell you who the real magicians are. Steviva Ingredients. Steviva has more than two decades of experience in R&D and clean-label sugar reduction in a variety of applications: beverage, baked goods, fillings, frostings, condiments. Give em a call. They’ll create a solution for you. If they can help me, they can help you. Go check them out at stevivaingredients.com.

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • Clean Label and communication all over the world
  • A discussion about food science and perspective and engineering
  • The difference between US and Israel food education
  • Will clean meat be kosher? Well, religion is not science, right?
  • What the heck is red label?

What do you tell people what you do?: I develop new cheese product. I don’t usually use the word Food Engineer unless someone knows what a food engineer is
What is a food engineer?: A food scientist who understands engineering and processing concepts
Strauss Group: Milk products, cheese products, cold filled dips
Do you think people think food scientists get a lot of negative press?: Yes, even in Israel.
Steps to be a food scientist in Isreal: All people in Israel must serve in the military. Anton served in the navy. Then studied food engineering in IIT Israel Institute of Technology. Product Developer in Unilever, Food Engineer at Enzymotec (Krill and fish oil) but the company was too small, couldn’t advance.
What’s the most important skill you need in your job?: Flexibility. Try to see the bigger picture
When you entered your first job, did you feel prepared?: Absolutely not. 90% of the things, you don’t know how to do. You just know a little bit more.
What would have been better?: Faculty should be more involved in industry. But it might depend on the institute, or even country.
My Food Job Rocks: I can eat, I can eat new things, I can be proud of what I can make
What would be your dream job title?: CEO. You get to set the direction of the products
Do you have any CEO’s you look up to?: Richard Brandson of Virgin. Steve Jobs of Apple (duh)
What do you look for most in a job?: A sense of mission. How do I make the world a better place?
Kosher
Food Trends and Technology: Lab Grown Meat Clean Meat
Biggest Challenge the Food Industry has to face: Negative image of the food industry
Are there any companies that are doing a good job at improving food image?: Strauss does a bit
Favorite Quote: Hippocratus- Let Food be Thy Medicine and let Medicine be thy food
Favorite Food: Avacado – I’m making Guacamole weekly. You can actually grow Avocado in Israel.
Any advice for anyone to go into the food industry: Don’t be afraid of following your dreams
If you were to tell your freshman self something, what would it be?: Take more engineering classes. Not just food, but more complex chemistry.
Why do other disciplines synergize with food engineers?: If you understand both sides, it’s great
Anton asks me a question: How did you do this?

Other Links

Frutarom
IFF
Givaudan
Symrise
Quark
Clean Label and Cost Reduction
CE 300 – Ascorbic Acid
Job Hopping
Red Label – Implemented in Chilie, Israel,
USDA Added Sugars delay

Sep 7, 2017

Hey everyone! This is a bonus episode! It's also really long.

Kim from Peas on Moss and I recorded this a long time ago, but I figured I would post this since we've been talking about careers a lot on the podcast/blog.

So I talk a bit less modest in this episode, and maybe I'm a bit too honest this episode. Whether you agree with me on the points I make, I hope you find value in them. If you disagree, then challenge them and tell me what you think.

We talk a lot on all sorts of subjects such as job hopping, resume, the purpose of life, preparedness in a degree, podcasting life, all stuff of that nature.

No sponsors this episode. This one is a freebie.

(warning: we do say "you know" way too much in this interview. Enjoy!)

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • How long should you stay at your job and how does that matter?
  • Adam’s track record
  • Storytelling is the best skill ever
  • Discussing ethnic background
  • CV’s and resumes
  • Passion versus Skill
  • How to be prepared for your first job
  • Master’s versus Work Experience
  • Risk versus Failure: Different roles have different values of risk
  • How to answer questions in your job
  • Who to talk to when you don’t know the answer
  • How to deal with greedy people and how to deal with them
  • How to find and identify A players and C players
  • Extroversion versus Introversion
  • How Adam stopped being Shy
  • How people can take advantage of teaching niche jobs
  • Catalysts of Change

What We Talk About

Twin Screw Extrusion
Andrea Zeng
Leadpage
My Department Head’s CV
Xennial
Millenials ruin everything
Little Bets
Fiona Salim
Impostor Syndrome
Myer’s Briggs
Kim is an ENTJ
Adam is an ENTP
Crematory Association
How Podcasting Changed My Life
Michael Kalanty
James Altucher
Derek Sivers – Bronze Medalist

Sep 4, 2017

How can I describe Michael McDonnell? He is transparent, technical, and full of energy. Not bad for a 25 year old running his own recruitment company.

His job is to reach out and find what food companies are looking for and I have some good news for those of you listening, these people are looking for experts.

I grill Michael on all sorts of crazy questions that I felt like when I looked for a job and Michael answered these like, really well. And I ask questions such as how companies look for rockstars, the benefits of using a recruiter, what an ATS system is and why does everyone use it, and my personal question: how long should someone be in their job? Michael answers all of these with short and direct honesty and I just learned so much from this interview.

So sit back and relax as we look into how recruiting works and how that will benefit you.

Sponsor - FoodGrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Sponsor - Steviva Ingredients

Has marketing ever asked you to pull a rabbit out of a hat? I know they have with me. They want clean-label sugar reduction because that’s the trend. And in addition to clean label, we need to follow the ever-changing FDA laws, meet low cost parameters AND create a product that tastes EXCELLENT – with no aftertaste issues.

They want us to make magic happen. 

Who do they think we are - Houdini?

Let me tell you who the real magicians are. Steviva Ingredients. Steviva has more than two decades of experience in R&D and clean-label sugar reduction in a variety of applications: beverage, baked goods, fillings, frostings, condiments. Give em a call. They’ll create a solution for you. If they can help me, they can help you. Go check them out at stevivaingredients.com.

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge bombs

  • How job hopping is disrupting all the industries
  • How to squeeze things out of people and get really valuable information (through kindness)
  • Mike’s opinion on Whole foods and Amazon
  • Adam’s special gift: getting free food

What do you tell people about you?: I partner with organizations or I make things. I build partnerships and deals. We really work with the company
What do you consider a finalist for a search?: Whatever the company specifically wants, but also questioning their initial requirements. We want to exceed those expectations
How do you find clients in the food and beverage industry and how do you communicate with them?: It starts with being on the phone. It requires a lot of cold calling. Maybe 100 phone calls to connect with another company.
Who do you contact when you cold call?: Our best way is to connect with the Hiring Manager so we can find the right service to find the right people
Does everyone want a Rockstar or do they not want a rock star?: Depends. Sales people want a Rockstar. For QA or data based, you might not want someone super extraverted.

Job search tips

Usually, people want the best of the best. Job boards might actually show the best of the worst

“It’s better to be employed than not employed” most people think this but sometimes good people get in unfortunate circumstances

A recruiter has a genuine conversation with a hiring manager and really focuses on getting the best fit and exploring options

ATS system- automatic tracking system which is a vetting system that looks for 5 key words. Your resume might not even be looked at another person

Cultural fit is absolutely critical for job success

It takes seconds for people to look at your resume

Job hopping: It’s so easy now and you can increase your salary faster. We don’t know what will happen 10 years from now, but now it’s 2 years.

How long should you stay at your job?: I’d say 5 years.

How did you get you to get to you where you are today?: I’m 24, I’m the youngest owner in my recruiting network. Worked for ConAgra brands (Territory Sales), Shanghai university of finance and economics, military active orders, disctrict manager in training for truck stops. Mentor told me to open a recruiting firm. Basically I had conversations with the right individuals. I have always wanted a job in CPG and in the food industry.
What is the most important skill you can have in the food industry?: Flexibility and adaptability. Things are moving so fast that you’ll be left in the dust
Common themes between excellent candidates: People who strategically plan their future. This might be through their resume or by just talking to him.
My Food Job Rocks: I get to speak with amazing, unique individuals
What’s the most interesting conversation you have?: I cold called a famous TV person and gave value.
Food Trends and Technology: Adaptable Experts and not so much specialized experts
Biggest Problem in the Food Industry: Lots of “foo-foo” going on un terms of claims. Consumer needs to educate themselves. There’s a lot of documents that involve claims
What is one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: I’d ask a question: where is the largest need? I’d ask this to 100 people and gather the responses.
Favorite Quote: Help enough people to get what they want and the world will give you what they want
There are no problems we can solve together and very few problems we can solve ourselves
I listen to hour motivationial quotes on youtube
Favorite kitchen item: knife. You can change things around and it’s dangerous
Favorite book: The Maxwell Daily Reader
Do you have any advice for anyone who wants to go into the food industry?: Ask questions. You can open so many doors by asking questions to people. Ask people why do they eat what they eat.
What do you eat?: I eat it all. I research a lot on diets but then I eat a lot sometimes. I eat a lot of protein. 
What are the common myths about job searching you’d like to dispel?:
“There’s no jobs”. As of now, there are tons of jobs. “I’m over qualified” It’s pretty easy to downgrade
Where can we find you?: Linkedin McDonnellm2 GRN Columbia.com

Other Links

5 Whys ask Why 5 times
Sweets and Snack Expo

 

Aug 28, 2017

Lin Carson is one of those amazing people who will give away knowledge for free. In this case, her amazing technical expertise in the bakery industry has made her able to share this on an awesome website called Bakerpedia. Think of it as Wikipedia, but for bakers!

If you are into bread, especially in a commercial sense, you will absolutely love this interview.

So get ready, for an exciting segment about baking, along with the tips of finding and joining high growth companies, the latest amazing technology in the baking industry, and maybe this episode will inspire you to make a wiki site on your own.

About Lin Carson

A passionate trailblazer who constantly challenges current ways of thinking when it comes to innovation and sustainability in the field of grain science, Dr Lin Carson’s love affair with baking started about 20 years ago when she earned her BSc degree in Food Science & Technology at the Ohio State University. Keen on deepening her knowledge in baking, bread and grain product texture, she went on to earn her MSc then PhD from the Department of Grain Science at Kansas State University.

In 2007, she started the R&D program and baking lab at Wendy's New Bakery Company in Ohio where she managed the team responsible for product development, ingredient and equipment sourcing, analysis equipment and procedures, specification development and commercialization.

Opportunity came knocking in 2013 and Dr Carson took up the position of Director of Technical Services at Dave's Killer Bread (DKB) in Portland, OR. There, she oversaw food safety, quality, co-manufacturing and R&D procedures.

Her experience heading the R&D departments at two of America’s leading food brands was invaluable and was how she discovered a huge gap in technical information sharing.

When she’s not running BAKERpedia, Dr Carson serves as Treasurer on the Board of Directors at the American Society of Baking, a role she has held since 2007. One of her notable achievements is spearheading the Product Development Competition that aims to identify and reward innovative thinking in commercial baking processes.

Aside from all things bakery, Dr Carson is married with three boys and is a self-proclaimed health nut. She trains regularly for Triathlons as a hobby with a transition goal of under 1 minute.

About BAKERpedia

A year later, armed with knowledge, conviction and sheer guts, Dr Carson launched BAKERpedia with the ultimate aim of strengthening the entire baking ecosystem, allowing ideas to thrive, improving efficiencies and encouraging opportunities for growth.

Today, as the world’s only FREE and comprehensive online technical resource for the commercial baking industry, BAKERpedia is used by commercial bakers, ingredient sellers, equipment suppliers and baking entrepreneurs who have easy access to the answers they need to make informed decisions daily.

This Episode is Sponsored by Foodgrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion–there’s something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

[New] This Episode is Also Sponsored by Steviva Ingredients

Hey everyone, we have a new sponsor on the podcast and I am happy to introduce you guys to the wonderful people at Steviva, a sweetener company in Oregon. If you want to hear more about this amazing company, listen to episode 72 with their CEO Thom King. What’s really cool about Steviva is that they are changing their whole company into something bigger and better and I love telling the story of how this will happen. As we progress, we plan to go through the process of Steviva’s transformation and inform you on what this amazing company can do for you.

For more information about Steviva, go to http://www.stevivaingredients.com/

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • Why baking is complicated versus other areas of food
  • Being in Operations versus in the Lab
  • A discussion about clean label and skilled labor

Question Summary

One sentence: I’m the CEO of Bakerpedia.com . A free resource on baking technology
How Bakerpedia happened: Food Science Degree, Grain Science Degree, running technical teams in the bakery industry, had an idea, found a gap, worked 2 years without any pay to get it off the ground
What do you consider a growing company?: To be really aggressive, have double digit growth percentage a year.
Can any company at any size be a growing company?: Great people make growth happen. Big companies just have a harder time getting great people
What have you taught your team to be great at their jobs?: Mainly technical skills and basic knowledge of the baking industry. Be open to learn more and more
Where do you gather your technical knowledge?: On the job training, courses, AIB, etc. You have to be on the job.
Was it hard to make Bakerpedia?: Not at all. Launching is really easy. The most challenging thing: How to monetize
My Food Job Rocks: I get to learn something different from different bakers every time and bake amazing bread.
Consulting arm: Lin works with 2 high growth clients. That’s enough for her
Food trends and Technology: Rapid Hydration. A high seed sprayer. Patent: Rapido-jet
When can we expect these new bakery innovations to happen?: Biggest factor is cost. Equipment can last a very long time. Some mixers can last 30 to 40 years.
What is something in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: Why aren’t companies cleaning up their labels? Why are they fighting to change their ingredients? The technology is there.
Job Hopping: You can’t change that. You have to identify good leaders
How do you identify good leaders?: Your network needs to be large. Many years of experience.
Do you have a question on how to identify good leaders?: No
Who inspired you to get into food?: My father owned a food brokerage and I hung out in their kitchen
Favorite Quote: The only way to discover the limits of the possible is to go beyond the limits and test the impossible. Arthur C Clark: Scifi Writer
Favorite Book: David and Goliath – Malcolm Gladwell also does Revisionist Gladwell
Favorite Kitchen Item: Table Top Hobart Version
Favorite Food: Bread. I am on this 90 loaves in 90 day journey. Check eatbread90.com
Favorite bread: An imported Australian bread with a peral flour
Do you have any advice for people wanting to go to the food industry?: Go ahead, we need you! A lot of startups do not have food scientists on their teams.
How do we contact you?: If you want inspiration as a working mother, connect with me on facebook.
You need to be passionate about what you do. Once you have enough passion, it doesn’t feel like work.

Links

AIB facility in Kansas Cracker Training Course
Kansas State University Grain Science
Wendy’s
Dave’s Killer Bread
Bakeryconcepts.net
Why are manhole covers round?
eatbread90.com

Aug 21, 2017

An Overview of Ideation to Commercialization

This episode is going to be a bit different than other episodes. Most episodes were reflection based or stuff about my life but I guess I might have ran out of things to talk about in my life. At least for now.

So in this episode, I’m going to talk about the life cycle of a product, how an idea forms, goes through the gauntlet and then commercialized to make tens of thousands of something you've created.

Along the way, I’ll give you some tips on how to make this process faster, or who you have to deal with to succeed in this aspect.

Most people in a food company don’t know the whole process. Those that do either learn from a startup or force themselves to get involved. I’m the latter. After a recent project where it’s finally launching, I now have full confidence in how a product is made.

There are a ton of moving parts and I hope that this episode will break down and show you how to actually make a food product from idea to selling it to millions.

This Episode is Sponsored by Foodgrads

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion–there’s something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

[New] This Episode is Also Sponsored by Steviva Ingredients

Hey everyone, we have a new sponsor on the podcast and I am happy to introduce you guys to the wonderful people at Steviva, a sweetener company in Oregon. If you want to hear more about this amazing company, listen to episode 72 with their CEO Thom King. What’s really cool about Steviva is that they are changing their whole company into something bigger and better and I love telling the story of how this will happen. As we progress, we plan to go through the process of Steviva’s transformation and inform you on what this amazing company can do for you.

For more information about Steviva, go to http://www.stevivaingredients.com/

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Transcript

Ideation

There are two types of areas where ideas come from: external or internal.

External ideas are based off of market research, or what’s currently selling, or even as simple as “this product exists, but it has x problem, let’s invent a product that doesn’t have x problem”. Most of the time, people in the marketing department develop something called a competitive or gap analysis which lists 5 to 10 of the top selling product’s strengths and weaknesses.

An easy way to develop an idea is to just look at a competitive analysis and increase the positive attributes by like 20% and then also remove anything negative.

One example is if I did a competitive analysis about protein bars and I see that the max protein bar is 20 grams  of protein and uses sucralose, I could probably be “innovative” and sell a protein bar with 24 grams of protein and no sucralose. Though most companies would balk at the idea that this is the way they “innovate”, when you boil it down, it’s pretty much that.

Another method of ideation is internal and this takes a high amount of intuition and out-of-the-box thinking. This is an extremely hard type of innovation that is based off of finding the cutting edge of innovation and thinking differently. Only a few people have the talent of connecting the dots, but if you feel like you do, then go for it.

Again, I want to stress how hard and risky this is. The bigger the company, the more people are going to think you are insane for even bringing it up. But what do they know? They don’t know food as much as you do right?

The best example I have in this situation is Apple (of course). Innovation doesn’t have to be completely new, but it has to be so out of the box people think you’re insane. For example, no headphone jack? That’s insane! Why would they do that? I’m not a tech expert, but that is one example, of an internally inspired innovation.

Another food related example is taco bell. In my podcast, I talk about the naked chicken chalupa a lot because I am so amazed that taco bell made a taco shell out of fried chicken. No average company would ever think about doing that.

So ideas are great but convincing a whole team that an idea is great is the fun part.

Most ideas come from founders or marketing. Depending on the company, research and development is involved, but not as often as you think. They’re the experts and they know their customers, so they are in charge with their ideas. As a product developer, you should respect that.

But idea approval is messy and there are several ways of doing this. So how do you validate an idea? The biggest toolset in your arsenal is data. Collecting data that your idea will work out is the best way to prove that this idea is legit, but event that has its downfall. Most really innovative ideas might not even come to fruition because it’s so ahead of their time, or the method of collecting data is wrong.

In all due respect, the best way of having an idea be approved by a body just takes a charismatic person who knows how to push the right buttons and convince someone that their idea will make a lot of money. I know this isn’t what most people want to hear, but that’s the way most crazy ideas happen, and also the most terrible mistakes.

This is a really specific type of company culture: the culture of accepting ideas. Most companies say ideas come from anywhere, but most companies don’t implement it. All that is true is that the chain of command is really long and eventually, a product has to reach someone at the top and they have to stamp their mark of approval. Good luck!

Pre- Commercialization

So an idea gets approved and then what? You have to then do the work to make the product tangible to the manufacturing team, whether this manufacturing team is a copacker or owned by your company.

This includes a variety of steps which mainly includes making optimal prototypes and gathering documentation on what the ingredients are. Again, different companies have different methods but the big idea is, you have to develop a good recipe that is easily reproducible and make sure it doesn’t kill or sue anyone.

So for me, developing a prototype is the fun part and there are tons of ways to do it. If you are under nutritional barriers such as it has to be under this amount of calories or must have this much protein, then it’s best to start doing the nutritional data analysis first than to go in the kitchen and go to town.

A good prototype has to go through a vetting process and there are many ways to do it, but all of them involve having someone taste your product. In small companies, maybe you just need a couple of people who like it. In big companies, maybe 20 to 50 people have to like the taste before validating your product can be brought up to a higher being.

This higher being is what I liked to call, a judge. Someone who has the authority to approve or disaspprove your hard work. In some cases, this is the marketing department, or the executive, or the founder of a company.

The more data you have where people actually like your product, the more you can convince the “judge” to approve your product. Most rational people will approve something if the majority of people like it, even if he or she doesn’t. But that’s not always the case. Sometimes, the judge will say “I don’t like this, I wish it has this, this this, and you have to go back to the lab and try again.

Barely anyone gets it right the first time. Some ideas go through 100s of iterations and still get scrapped. But that’s the life of a product developer.

So let’s say you convince marketing and the “judge” that your prototype is awesome? It’s going to be very important to eventually get documents of all of these ingredients and archive them. For me, this is the worst part of the job, but it is a necessary evil. There are some innovations in the pipe line to make this easier, like RogoHub, but it will be a very long time before everyone is on board.

Getting documents usually involves getting proof from a sales person about the ingredients you put into your food. For example, you need the nutrition facts. If your product is gluten free, then you need a certificate verifying it’s gluten. If it’s Non-GMO, you have to get a statement, but maybe you even need a certificate. Ideally, your boss should have a good system to gather, sort, and archive docuemtns so in case of any outbreak, you’ll be ready to pull out the source. If you don’t have something like this, start one.

In some companies, this task is shared among product development, quality assurance, and regulatory or maybe just one of them.

This is serious stuff and is going to be super important in the future.

Do note, in most companies, this is the sole purpose of a product developer, or a person in research and development who develops new products. If you had to focus on one thing in the corporate behemoth, this is where you should be the expert at.

Commercialization

Once pre-commercialization passes, then you go into the complex world of commercialization which now involves almost every department working together to complete a timeline. This includes planning, inventory, transportation, packaging, labels, product marketing, procurement, product development, regulatory, and quality assurance, oh, and generally, a Project Manager is in charge of it too.

So it works like this: the “Judge” approves of a product in pre-commercialization, and then the company has to make a huge investment to actually make the product. Planning has to make the forcast oh how many will sell, inventory has to make sure there’s enough room in the warehouse and develop systems to track the product, transportation has to coordinate moving the product everywhere, packaging has to develop or confirm the packaging used is correct, labels has to design something pretty and compliant, product marketing monitors if everything’s ok, product developers get blamed for everything, regulatory makes sure we have all of the doohickies to pass it thoggh the boarders (if necessary), and quality assurance makes sure we have all of the specs necessary to document in case we get into trouble.

You see this sort of ecosystem sprout out that depending on the company, is either treated as a harmonious beautiful, collaboration, or like Game of Thrones in which a lot of unexpected drama happens either internally in the company, or externally say, a factory mishap or a communication error.

So commercialization takes a tremendously long time just because of so many people and professions are collaborating together. Technically, you’re going to do the least amount of work here but that might not always be the case. You now take on the role of someone who verifies things such as factory manufacturing reports, and how labels writes things on the level. If you have the confidence, you also become an authority figure on the product (though marketing might fight you for it).

The best way to handle commercialization is not only be an expert at what you do (creating great products) but also be a great communicator with all of the clashing personalities, and the clashing professions.

In general, the time frame from commercialization starts with a forecast which goes into motion. If you don’t have a forecast, then well, better just throw money in the pot and see what happens. A Label file gets circulated around departments that all departments confirm around. Your job here is to verify they are using the right ingredients, the right claims, and the right label. That’s about all. Marketing copy or what ugly color they use to represent your products has nothing to do with you.

During this time, we communicate with the manufacturer. The manufacturer sends replicate samples of the formula to cross check if communication between formulas is ok. Usually, a triangle sensory test is used to make sure no one can statistically tell the difference between the two products. between corporate and procurement gets a pilot protocol in motion. A pilot is a test run with the manufacturer to make sure they can actually run the lab sample. A pilot is a big step for a small investment. It tests everything about communicating with the contract manufacturer. It tests their mettle in gathering ingredients, communicating with the corporate team, and most importantly, confirms that the product can be made and tastes relatively the same compared to your formula sheet. Packaging is also important, and are usually packaged in blank film or white stocked depending on the product.

After the pilot sample is approved (byt the way, you’ll have 100s of samples to give away), procurement initiates the production run which takes about 6 to 10 weeks at minimum before starting production.

Post- Commercialization

For a product developer, not much goes on here. Quality assurance usually takes the reigns and deals with some check list stuff. However, it is important to keep track of how well your product is doing. You can always ask planning or marketing for the digits.

However, now since your product has launched, there are so many other things that can go wrong and all of them focus on either cost reduction or raw material issues. Things that are very hard for a product developer to predict.

Cost reduction involves changing one ingredient with another, usually cheaper ingredient. Cheap doesn’t mean lower quality, over time, things get cheaper due to technological advancements. Low cost projects are usually due to high volume and a bunch of other stuff I don’t really focus on.

Raw material issues involve a supplier completely running out of a material and everyone panics. Issues like this are terrible because sometimes the material is so unique or there is a shortage in the world in general. Purchasing will hound you to find a replacement and then there is no replacement because there is no substitute! Whatever.

So what separates good product developers from great product developers?

Well, it’s a simple answer. How far do you want to understand the process? Do you just want to do your thing?

From the people I’ve interviewed, and the people I’ve asked for advice, understanding the complexities of turning your idea into something people buy and eat is one of the keystones to becoming a great product developer.

But you actually can’t be an expert at everything.

The best product developers are the ones who can communicate and understand the process, and have the confidence to convince people that they know what they are doing. They are the ones who can convince marketing on the challenges of making something, or can work with a manufacturer to make their formula a reality. It’s getting info from various sources on what’s running out so you can prepare to kake changes or subsitutution.

To summarize, a good product developer knows not only their role, but how to communicate their role to others.

The more you understand the process, the more autonomous you can be, and the more you know what you’re actually talking about. Yes, it’s a daunting step to know how all of this works, but you don’t become great in your own bubble.

 

Aug 14, 2017

Elliot Begoun is the Principal of The Intertwine Group, which a practice focused on helping emerging food and beverage brands grow. He works with clients to design and execute customized route-to-market and go-to-market strategies that build velocity, gain distribution, and win share of stomach. His articles appear in publications such as the Huffington Post, SmartBrief, and FoodDive.

Elliot has had a lot of experience in the food industry. 25 years to be exact and he knows what makes good companies tick. His knowledge about marketing, supply chain and retail management astound me and I hope they do for you too.

In this episode, be prepared to learn how to be a successful food company, our predictions in the grocery space, and the common obstacles brands struggle with, and how to over come this obstacles

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion–there’s something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

- When to share information versus asking for money
- What Elliot describes as being a food lifer
- Why entreprenuers should focus on what the grocery industry will become in 5 years

Question Summary

Sentence or less: I help emerging food and beverage brands grow
How do you network?: It’s more about establishing relationship.
How do you establish trust?: Go all in and help someone when asked
What do you do?: I’m a principal. I understand and analyze emerging businesses and make them grow
How did you get to where you are today?: Almost went to law school, so he got into general management at a small restaurant franchise, Bon Vorong, Graduate School, Shamrock Foods for 18 years, Foster Farms, then Intertwine
Did you find an MBA useful?: I got more self-confidence and I absorb information better, but it’s debatable
What skill do you need to be a successful food company?: You have to learn how to listen. You also have to learn how to be a problem solver
My Food Job Rocks: I get to be part of a lot of companies and I love seeing them in stores
Food Trends and Technology: Meal kits and how to bring amazing foods to busy families
The biggest challenge the food industry needs to face: How are we going to feed 9 billion people?
Are there any companies that are changing the food system?: There are lots of companies doing it in different ways. For example, dairy farms collecting methane and ugly fruit
What is one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: After 28 years, I still have no idea what it’s about
Who inspired you to get into food?: Restaurant management job: it was offered to me. On my next job, I got a mentor and she taught me everything. Then I got into retail and it was like a real fun puzzle.
Favorite Book: A More Beautiful Question
My Quote:
The quality of your life is determined by the quality of your questions. — Dr. John Demartini
What do you think new brands struggle with the most?: Distribution philosophy. Build a compelling argument for your consumers to buy your products again and again and again to build velocity
What is your advice for funding?: Make money first
Do you have advice for anyone who wants to go into the food industry?: Run!
Just kidding: The food industry is enormous. Go somewhere where you can make a difference. Also. Learn!
How to reach Elliot: www.theintertwinegroup.com ; elliot@theintertwinegroup.com

Other Links (we link Elliot's Articles Here)

Food Dive
Huffington Post
Aldi’s
Lidl
Fancy Food Show

 

Aug 7, 2017

While scrolling through some linkedin folks I found Jessica Goldstein’s lecture she did at the RCA. About a week before, one of my friends sent me a link to her and said she might be good to interview. So I did.

Jessica is part of the Nu Spice family business, with her partner in crime being her father. She’s grown up in the food industry all of her life but she first decided to work in an electronics firm’s marketing company. But after a few weeks, she hated it and decided to go all in for the food industry. That means hustling small buisnesses, reading the USDA Standards and Labeling guideline page to page, and enjoying and analyzing every part of her food.

One of my favorite things about Jessica is her ability to describe flavors in such a way, that both the technical minded and the culinary minded would just melt. You’ll hear a couple of great food descriptions within this interview such as when I ask her what she had for dinner yesterday. Hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • How Jessica went from marketing to food
  • The dynamic between Jessica and her father in the family business
  • How Jessica learns and keeps learning about food science

Question Summary

The influences in how to where you got to where you are today: Grandfather owned food business in New York, Grandpa sold it, father worked in food industry and then bought it. Jessica decided to step in and modernized the business after she hated her marketing job
Popular in Cuba: no Cubano's, after the age of seven, people don’t eat dairy
What do you tell people when you first meet them?: I play with your food, I design flavor profiles for food manufacturers
Education: Jessica has a masters in food science and bachelors in creative writing and psychology
Nu Spice’s niche: medium sized meat manufacturers who want to develop new flavors
Important Skills for developing: Know the customer’s consumer. Whole foods customer has a different perspective than Food City
How did you learn food science vocabulary?: My suppliers educate me. Also learning to educate people on this vocabulary
Important skills for selling: It’s a people business. People buy from people that they like
Food Trends and Technology: Veggie Burgers, Safeway launches Beyond Meat burgers
Who is feeding the world?: Monsanto (despite their controversy) is feeding the world in poor places
Food trends: Northern African flavors, stews, Horesus hue – Paprika paste, savory, fermentation such as sriracha and miso
Favorite Book: Modernist Cuisine. You can download it on a tablet
Be creative and innovation is everywhere
What was the most amazing thing you ate last?: Stuffed Artichoke Butterflies
Advice in the food industry: You need to love food

Other Links

RCA Conference
James Calvetti Meats
Nu Products Seasoning Company or Nu Spice – Family owned business
Hoboken, New Jersey
LG Electronics Marketing Department
Thai Basil
Sweet Basil
Red basil
USDA Standards and Labeling Guidelines book
Bone Marrow and bread
Bone Marrow in Hawaii where you take a shot in the bone
Life is too short to eat the same thing twice
Standards of Identity
Top-Note

Jul 31, 2017

This episode is all about Fair Trade, you’ll not only learn about Equifruit’s focus on bananas, but also what other products can be fair trade, awesome resources in the fair-trade industry, and things of that nature.

Kim herself is an expert salesperson. Ever since she was 18 years old, she learned to go out and sell, and we talk over her expert techniques and here’s a secret… it’s all about perspective.

Also to note is Kim’s philosophy in life. She’s had so many jobs but because she loved what she did, and that opened more and more opportunities in her life. Something to think about.

So in this episode, you’ll learn where bananas come from, how a diamond ring can be fair trade, and how to be an amazing sales person

About Kim

Kim is a native Montrealer with a passion for all things food.  She graduated from Concordia University with a degree in Psychology and pursued further education at St. Pius X Culinary Institute, where she attained a diploma in French cuisine.  Kim has worked in sales from the start of her career: restaurant, retail, spa industry, catering and now, Fairtrade bananas!

Kim joined Equifruit as sales manager in late 2014.  After nearly 15 years of sales experience, she wanted to be more connected on a social justice level.  She loves the challenge of convincing Canadian customers to put farmers first.  Kim brings to the table relentless optimism, contagious enthusiasm and an irrevocable passion for fair trade.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • Where fair trade bananas come from
  • How everything can be fair trade
  • How fair trade funds farmer’s kids with money

Question Summary

What do you tell people you do?: Exotic fair trade fruit saleswoman. A light intro on fair trade
Fair Trade: Doing business on fair terms. The producer gets paid properly.
When I was 18 years old: Sales as B2B. Cold calling. Selling a product from door to door
How did you put yourself out there when finding your next gig?: Social media
How to be a good sales person: A really good salesperson reads people well. Everything from the tone of your voice to the language
Does good sales people come from books or experience?: It might be more innate than you think. You can develop a salesperson, but you have to be perceptive. An introvert can be a salesperson
Food Trends and Technologies: Purchasing habits of Bananas. People are buying products because of the value of the products
Where do you find your sales research?: Canadian Government Websites
Who inspired you to get into food?: My family
Career path: I study the things I find interesting. You have to love what you do, but there will be challenges. Ask the questions: what would you do for free? Or what excites you?
Kitchen Item: I’m a knife snob. I have to carry my knives for vacation
Advice for a Sales Job: Ask to be paired to an expert salesperson
Favorite Food: Salad and fresh fruits. I would wait for the seasons to enjoy my fruit
Advice about life: It’s more important to love what you do because it opens up amazing opportunity. You’ll be a happier human being.
Equifruit.com
Equifruit Twitter
Equifruit Instagram
Equifruit facebook
Equifruit linkedin

Other Links

Fairtrade Canada
Fairtrade.net
Canadian Fairtrade network
Guelph Organic Tradeshows
Canadian Produce Marketing Association
Fair Trade Chocolate, Sugar, Tea
Fair Trade cotton shirt
Fairtrade Diamond Ring
Farm and Food Care
BA Psychology Concordian University
Saint Pious the 10th – Culinary School
Catering Company
Fighting the Banana Wars Harriett Lam
Social introvert
Good survey about personalities
Neilson

 

Jul 24, 2017

Food Law is one of those topics I fell asleep at in college. But it wasn’t until working in the industry did I find just how important it really is.

If you’ve been a fan of this podcast, you might have heard my frustrations learning about how the Europeans deal with GMOs. If you’re a first time listener, I’ll talk about it again.

But Ceasare Varallo is the man when it comes to making me excited about food law. He’s a lawyer in Italy who focuses on such things as food fraud, regulatory compliance, and communicating crises.

This is an amazing interview all about being a food lawyer. You’ll learn how to get a job in regulatory, how to get people to trust you as an expert and the amazing food technologies Cesare’s really into. One in particular that I haven’t heard of until recently… block chain technology

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • Ceasare’s work is three fold: food safety, regulatory, and managing communication
  • How Ceasare found his niche in food law
  • Why regulatory is getting more and more important
  • The interesting things about food marketing
  • How to learn more about food regulatory

Question Summary

Introduction in a sentence or less?: I’m a food lawyer. I help food companies to reach the compliance
Cesare started with commodities at first and then went to more complicated things later
Steps it took to get to where you are today: Criminal lawyer, switched law firm and found food clients. Noticed about the specific type of advice
Foodlawlatest.com

Blogging advice
If you have good content, it will be successful
Avoid scandal or “fake news”, give useful facts
Interacting with your audience is super important

What’s the most important skill you need for your job?: How you communicate and interact with people
How do you get people to trust you more?: A blog with good content is a sign of trust, facts are a sign of trust, showing that you really know what you’re talking about. Keep on delivering good content and make them comfortable.The customer today is much more informed
Customers are reading more food labels and are willing to spend good, safe, tasty and authentic food.
Food Technology: Smart Agriculture, Drones, Artificial Intelligence to spot food safety issues, block chains,
Block Chain: Technology used to secure the financial transactions: bitcoins/ cryptocurrency. Will help food fraud a lot.
Biggest Challenge the food industry needs to face: Fraudulence and trust. Big companies are not trusted. Local is more trusted. A small minority has a lot of power
What is something you would like to know more about?: Marketing. How much work it takes to do marketing campaigns. How do you make things Viral?
Favorite Book: Lord of the Rings
Favorite Quote: Winston Churchill: success consists of going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm
Favorite Kitchen Item: My favorite dish is risotto so I like a really big wooden spoon

If anyone wanted a job in regulatory, what should they study on their own?: You can find many courses in food law in United States. California and New York has plenty
Study the objective official source depending on countries. Common websites.
FDA website, Code of Federal Regulations
Not so simple in Europe: 26 countries with deviations
Independent blogs can work too

Advice getting into the food regulatory industry: Get your hands dirty. You can’t imagine the complexity with regulatory issues. It’s more about how you approach the problem
Where can we find you?: Foodlawlatest@gmail.com

Other Links

Foodlawlatest.com
Baby formula scandal
Olive Oil Book: Extra Virginity
Anti-Vaxxers
“We don’t trust science but everyone is eating supplements”
Viral Marketing
Coca-cola put names on the cans, and they monitor and test everything
Food Marketing Nerds Podcast

Jul 17, 2017

What’s the point of a food industry podcast if I can’t help you with your careers?

That’s why I’ve actually taken a liking on interviewing recruiters because recruiters know the best way to get a job.

Bob Pudlock is one of those people. He is an independent recruiter who knows his stuff. Taking an unconventional route, Bob went into recruiting because companies would pay him top dollar to recruit. Yep, one sentence solidified his career.

Bob has a lot of practical advice in the show such as how to make 100% use of job interviews when you have to pay for your own flight, the power of long-term networking, and one of my favorite topics, which is better? Factory experience or a master’s degree?

Shownotes: http://myfoodjobrocks.com/075Bob

About Bob Pudlock

Bob Pudlock is the owner and President of Gulf Stream Search, an executive search firm that works with companies in the food and nutritional supplement industries to identify, assess and capture top talent for their organizations.

Bob has been in the search industry for 17 years - he has placed individuals all throughout the US and Caribbean at all levels - most of the positions he fills are in R&D, Quality, Sales/Marketing, and Plant Operations throughout the US - he works with venture capital firms that focus on the food industry, start-ups, as well as established brands in the food and supplement industries.

Bob grew up in Cleveland, OH and attended John Carroll University where he played on the golf team.  He moved to South Florida in 2011 and is active outdoors with running, swimming, stand-up paddle board racing, fishing and bicycling.

5 top reasons My Food Job Rocks

1. I can work from anywhere - I conduct nearly all of my work via phone, email, and video.

2. I choose what companies, searches, and candidates I work with.

3. I make my own hours - I work as much or as little as I like - although my business demands a lot of my time, I still have the flexibility and control over my schedule to do the things I enjoy outside with the people close to me.

4. I control my income.

5. I get to work with up and coming talent in the food industry and I also get to work with companies that are changing the way we look at nutrition and health in general.  I get to work with people that are truly making a difference in the world.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

 

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • How to make the most of paying to fly to a job interview
  • Why you should go to hiring managers and not HR
  • How even the smallest talks can be impactful
  • The value of factory experience
  • The many factors about the lack of free labor

Question Summary

Sentence or less: I identify or recruit top talent in the food industry
What do you do specifically?: 2 things: companies go to him to find people and he finds great people
I focus on relationships and connecting
What was the time you talked to someone who didn’t accept the job at the time?: I try to open up to people to imagine the possibilities. I try to set more expectations.
What’s the best advice for growing your network?: Throw your net wide, not deep
The best thing about your job: The journey of hiring
Steps it took to get to where you are today: Ohio, Private schools, good at sports, underachiever, didn’t think what would happen when he grew up, golf coach, training salesmen, “Bob, we will pay you top dollar to find salespeople”, pet food recruiting, then expanded to more - Sometimes it’s ok not to know what you’re going to do
What’s the most common theme between excellent candidates?: For young people: curiosity for learning and getting to really understand all the different steps on the product development cycle
What is more valuable? Masters experience or Factory experience?: Factory experience. It can’t be replaced or supplemented at a later date.
For many people, most people want to do different things
Why Does Your Food Job Rock?:
It’s all about the journey. Also, I work for myself and I get to have control over who I work with
What is Bob’s Win Rate (Hired versus not hired): Average is 10-15 interviews for one hire. Bob has had impressive numbers. The secret is understand what the company is looking for
Food Trends and Technologies: The blurred lines between mainstream food and nutrition
What is the biggest challenge the food industry needs to face?: Skilled labor. Some reasons: we put our manufacturing plants in the middle of nowhere, lobbying to reduce regulations for hiring skilled labor.
Favorite Quote: The Man in the Arena.
Favorite Book: Oh the Places You’ll Go
Favorite Kitchen Utensil: Utensils that are not utensils
Advice on the food industry: If you’re going technical, get a degree. Think of other degrees like Masters or MBAs
What is a common myth that you’d like to dispel about job hunting?: The best resume doesn’t always win
Where can we find you?: Gulf Stream Search. Email: bob.pudlock@gulfstreamsearch.com
Phone number: 561-450-9490

Other Links

Hiring Manager – Someone who requests a new employee
H1B Visa

Jul 10, 2017

Steve Gendel has worked in the FDA for 25 years and this guy has had an amazing career doing so.

He’s been involved in the latest and greatest technologies ranging from early stage GMOs, Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, and of course, our favorite one right now, FSMA.

The best part of this episode is the very practical and real advice he give son how to get a job at the FDA. Of course, it’s a special mix of fiscal year luck, and who you know. He tells you the best places to meet people in the FDA, where the FDA usually works at (which of course, it’s not easy find), and when to start asking your contacts if there are positions open.

 http://myfoodjobrocks.com/074Steven

About Steven M. Gendel, Ph.D.

Dr. Gendel works to ensure safe food for everyone through education, consulting, and support of food manufacturers and organizations of all sizes as the Vice President, Division of Food Allergens, IEH Laboratories and Consulting Group. This includes facilitating compliance with the rules issued under the Food Safety Modernization Act, and supporting the development of Hazard Assessments and Food Safety Plans. He applies a scientifically sound approach to allergen control and testing, and to resolving compliance issues.  He is a Food Safety Preventive Control Alliance Preventive Controls Lead Trainer, a Certified Food Scientist, and an experienced speaker.  Previously he was the Food Allergen Coordinator for the US Food and Drug Administration where he lead policy initiatives, the development of regulatory documents, and assisted in enforcement activities.  He has over 25 years of experience in food safety science and policy and over 90 techincal publications. He held postdoctoral positions at Harvard University and the University of Toronto and was on the faculty of the Department of Genetics at Iowa State University before joining the FDA.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • Steve talks about why he stayed in the FDA for 25 years
  • How the FDA is funded
  • What the FDA controls
  • What Steve thinks has the best food safety programs
  • The best advice on how to get into the FDA
  • When to start looking for a FDA job

Question Summary

One sentence or less: I’m a food safety scientist. My job is the next thing you eat will not kill you
Best thing about your job: I feel like I’m really making the world safer
Step to get to where you are today: Undergraduate degree in engineering in KS Western reserve , Graduate in UC Irvine in biology, Department of Genetics in Iowa University, met someone at FDA which was now Institute of Food Safety and Health, stay with the FDA for 25 years, now a consultant

What is the difference between the FDA then and now?: A lot of external factors shape the projects such as consumer, laws and regulations, and new congressional turnover
The hot topic before you left: FSMA is coming into effect (well…. Maybe not anymore)
Most important skill you can have in food safety: Flexibility. Food safety is a very integrative type of field. There are a lot of pieces in Food Safety.

Projects Steve was involved in:

  • Potential allergens in GMOs (back when it was new)
  • Risk analysis modeling
  • Joint project between FDA and Health Canada about Soft-cheeses and L.monocytogenes
  • Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act. Thresholds for Allergens
  • Lead author of an allergen threshold report
  • Helped with FSMA’s preventative control

New Food Trends and Tech: Advanced Genome Technologies. Can be a great tool to understand pathogens. It helps you understand where they come from and then we can do that
Biggest Challenge the Food Industry has to face: Transparency. Mainly asking “why”
One thing you’d like to know more about: How companies invest in food safety and food safety program
Favorite Quote: To err is human but to really mess up, you need a computer
Favorite Food: Grilled Cheese Sandwich. Sharp Cheddar, Swiss Cheese, Artisanal Food
What Advice Would You Give TO Work In The FDA: At this particular time in history, it’s hard to say. However, meet people in the FDA. It’s who you know.

How to meet FDA people: Scientific Conferences. Local meetings at IFT and IAFP, American Chem Society, Society of Toxicology, talk to them, they will know others who do.
USAjobs.com
Office of Regulatory Affairs. There are District Offices. Contact the Deputy Director of that office
Commissioner’s Fellowship
ORISE- Oakridge
CIFSAN – Centers for Food Safety in Universities that work collaboratively. Can get graduate or postdoc positions
Fiscal Year for the Federal Government: Begins October 1st, ends October 1st. But start looking now
How to find Steve: linkedin

Other Links

Ep. 031 - Tiffany Lau
Myrian Zboraj – Quality Assurance Magazine
GATTACA
Walmart
Costco

 

Jul 3, 2017

Darin’s son died of an E.coli outbreak and he has spent the last 25 years devoting his life to making the world a safer place.

Within the last 25 years, he’s become a Doctorate in Law and Policy where his main focus is to implement Food Policy. He’s talked with doctors, scientists, law makers, and graduate students into fighting for food safety. In his spare time, he comforts people who have gone through the same troubles as he has, and shares their stories.

Darin does a great job weaving intricate stories to give you the sense of importance in Food safety, which includes aspects of history, humanity and Chipotle.

A serious note for this interview: This is a very dense and emotional conversation of food safety. Darin really cares about what he does, and by the end of the episode, I hope you have a renewed sense of importance in food safety.

About Darin 

Dr. Darin Detwiler is the Assistant Dean and a Professor of Food Policy at Northeastern University College of Professional Studies, Boston, MA.  He is a food industry consultant, columnist, and frequent speaker at events across the country and beyond.  

He is coincidentally going to be on American Greed (yes, that's his voice) this week 

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • Why deadly foodborne illnesses spikes during the summer months, which causes a bad experience in Thanksgiving
  • The stories behind statistics. Focus on the stories.
  • How the FDA has changed in the last 25 years
  • How people being lazy can cause massive damage
  • How history impacts food policy
  • Everyone has a role to play in food safety
  • Understanding the cause and effect in food safety
  • Why Darin chooses Academia to do Food Safety
  • How Darin balances out food industry stories and family stories and the differences between them
  • How Darin’s perception of food safety has changed over time
  • The lack of Ethics in the Peanut outbreak
  • We talk smack about Chipotle
  • I’m as old as Chipotle

Key Summary

How Darin has improved Food Safety: 1992 – operating a nuclear reactor, supported the USDA on food safety, went back to university and taught for 15 years in forensic science, Doctorate in Law and Policy and focus was on implementing food policy,
Two reasons why food safety fails: They don’t understand or they don’t care. Maybe we need to teach people earlier. Most Food Safety folly is based on greed
My Food Job Rocks: Food affects everyone and we connect to it on all aspects of life
What advice do you give people to excel at what they do?: If you see things and you don’t take action, or won’t eat your own product, ask questions. Be a self-advocate.
Why did Chipotle fail their food safety protocols?: Failure to invest in safety. The system needs work, but their response is textbook
What should Chipotle should have done to be better?: They can’t fix the past

Other Links

Stop Foodborne Illnesses
Jack-in-The-Box E.coli outbreak 1993
Food Fraud: Big in Europe
Bioterrorism
Upton Sinclair – The Jungle
Peanut Outbreak
Chipotle Outbreak
Contact: d.detwiler@neu.edu
Quality Assurance Magazine

Jun 27, 2017

I usually do a pre-interview with my guest, to kind of explain what we do, if they listen to the show, and stuff like that. However Thom’s pre-interview was so good that I had to share it.

Think of this as an episode where I invite an old friend out to coffee to see what’s going on with his life. Thom is an amazing person who reminds me a lot of Derek Sivers.

Thom is also a guest who loves to swear so I edited a few things so the itunes police doesn’t get me.

So you’re going to learn a bit about documentation, and also some great podcasts that Thom listens to. Also, the really awesome perks Thom has built up in Stevivia’s office. There is a reason for that. If you want a full reason, listen at myfoodjobrocks.com/072Thom

Enjoy!

Key Takeaways

  • The importance of documentation
  • Thom’s investment in employee happiness
  • How to have employees talk to you

Other Links

Non-GMO in Europe
Louis Hows – School of Greatness
Tom Bilyeu - Impact Theory
Mixergy Tom Bilyeu
Tim Ferriss Show
Kale Chips Healthy Crunch
How I Built This
One Question You Would Like to be Asked?: Why do you do what you do?
Weird things in Steviva’s office: Tomato’s and chickens, food Friday

Jun 26, 2017

 

Thom King is probably the best CEO I’ve ever had the chance to talk to. He’s fun, innovative, and he just loves his job and the people he works with.

I had a great hour and a half talk with him on my lunch break and had to find an excuse when I got back to work. This interview is that good.

Where to start from this interview… whether you’re a young professional, an old soul, or a struggling entrepreneur, Thom will give you advice on all aspects of your career.

You’ll learn how to deal with conflict in the work place, the touching reasons why Thom loves his job, the amazing first stage of stevia and the growth of the brand, and at the end of the segment, the power of having a good idea and working hard so that everyone knows you’re the best.

Remember: I am currently recording this at my hotel at IFT. Just saying, I’ll be there until Wednesday. If you’re available, I’d love to meet you. Just email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

 

About Thom King

Part CEO, part personal development wonk and part biohacker info geek, Thom is a self-confessed serial entrepreneur. While his favorite book list contains many success-oriented and personal-development classics, the classic definition of achieving success (e.g., making a lot of money) is not what inspires or motivates Thom. He follows more of a “you aren’t doing well unless you’re also doing some good” line of thinking. Thom’s company has been built around the simple principle of “do the right thing.”

Knowledge Bombs

- How to deal with conflict in the work place
- Literally the birth of Stevia
- How to get triple digit growth 3 years in a row
- Some methods to understand people
- Thom’s interesting hobby and how he makes them
- How to validate a good idea

Question Summary

Elevator Pitch: A sweetner that doesn’t affect blood sugar levels that became an ingredient company
Favorite thing to do as a CEO: Make my employees cry with tears of joy; Be appreciative with your employees
What do you think you do in a day?: Manage personalities
How many people are in your company?: 32 people
How do you deal with conflict?: Clashing is a function of a breakdown in communication; I learn about the problem, and get to a common ground
People who get under your skin: Imagine them as a six year old child

Steps it took: Thom met Jim while doing radio, he tasted Stevia, made Stevia extract in a  garage
Steviva was born in 1992
2008 – Stevia was given provisional GRAS status, moving Thom’s company to Food
Ever since 2015, Steviva has experienced triple digit growth

Metabolic disease: Obesity, diabetes
Why did you start a food company and what keeps you going?: Getting rid of metabolic disease is my why
Most important skill you can have in the industry: integrity. Constantly improve your product. Integrity is a service to makea  good product.
Food trends and technologies: Probiotics and fermentation
Thom makes his own probiotics and uses an 11 strain fiber

What is one thing you’d like to know more about?: Hydrocolloids, thickening agents
Example: thai chilli sauce, jam, etc
Favorite Quote: Tony Robbins: Anything is possible and it’s up to you to make it probable
Favorite Book: Right now is Tools of Titan
Favorite Kitchen Item: Sous Vide
Favorite Food: Spaghetti and Meatballs
Any Advice for starting your own business: listen to Gary Vee’s Podcast. You grind and grind and grind and grind some more
This is the best time in the world ever to start a business
Low entry points for validating your idea: social media and crowd funding
One thing you’d like to know about starting your business: more knowledge about Accounting
What’s next for Steviva: Moving to another facility. Quadrupalling the size of our R+D lab
Steviva: twitter, Instagram, etc
info@steviva.com --> direct it to Thom!


Other Links

Steviva
Nextiva brand – Stevia infused agave nectar
Marrakesh Spice
Provencal Anise
Maple syrup
Masala Chai Spice
DE 42 High fructose corn syrup
Jim May – Founder of Wisdom Naturals
DISC test – Analyzing human needs for all employees
Polyols/Erythritol
FDA rulings on fiber
Jerusalem Artichoke
Chicory Root
IMOs
Custom Probiotics Glendale Los Angeles
Flowbee- vaccum haircut
Ketogenic diet
Exogenous ketones

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