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My Food Job Rocks!

There is very little awareness of what the people in the food industry actually do. This stems back to the lack of knowledge and awareness of the range of degree courses and programs available that will equip them for a career in food. My FoodJobRocks! by Adam Yee is the first podcast of its kind that allows listeners to hear directly from people who are in the food industry and have a passion for what they do. They share how they became involved in food and describe what it is they do, plus a few more fun questions just to keep things entertaining. Listen to them here, and stay tuned for a new episode every Monday.
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Now displaying: April, 2017
Apr 24, 2017

We have a great guest today as Tiffany Tong, Strategic Initiatives lead at Canada’s Smartest Kitchen, enters the scene and brings with her an amazing story about doing what you should do, versus doing what you want to do.

See, Tiffany didn’t start in food. Not for a long time. She was actually in the ever stable and lucrative oil and gas industry. Her switch to food seemed easy on paper, but as we dive deeper in the interview, you realize that the journey had its challenges. I really appreciate Tiffany for sharing her story, and along with that, we talk a lot about how to strategize your company’s target clients, how to apprentice for a celebrity chef, and some really cool food jobs we found on the internet. Like… Chief Adventure Officer

About Tiffany

An insatiable learner, Tiffany's background ranges from supply chain management and organizational change management in the oil and gas industry to food media. To compliment her Bachelor of Commerce in Business Process Management, Tiffany received a Culinary Arts diploma from the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology. As the Food Media Developer for one of Canada's best-known chefs, she managed the production of two cookbooks, including the recipe development. As the newest member of the Canada's Smartest Kitchen team, Tiffany brings a unique blend of business and culinary experience combined with creativity and energy.

About Canada's Smartest Kitchen

For food companies of all sizes, Canada’s Smartest Kitchen’s team of chefs and scientists develop customized solutions to create better tasting food products tested by consumers. Their proprietary SMART Advantage Process for food product development supports startups and multinationals alike with a customizable suite of services that can inject value at any stage in a product’s pathway to market. 

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

That’s the end of the show everyone, if you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Key Takeaways

  • How Tiffany rebranded the company and found out their 4 major client bases
  • How volunteering landed her a gig with a celebrity chef
  • Tiffany’s great resources for food tech and food jobs

Question Summary

One Sentence or less: I have a very fancy title
Title:
Strategic Initiatives Lead at Canada’s Smartest Kitchen
How do people visit you?: Referrals, website
What does a Strategic Lead do?: Big ticket items such as funding applications, rebranding, service line extensions and expansions
Seafood companies
Functional Foods
Innovative Ingredient Suppliers
Artisan Producers
Career Timeline: Business Bachelors of Commerce at University of Calgary, to Supply Chain Oil and Gas, then organizational change management Northern Alberta Institute of Technology, to culinary arts, Moved to the Island to apprentice with Chef Michael Smith as a food media developer,
How did you apprentice with Chef Michael Smith?: I found a post on the internet. And I volunteered at a trade show with a TV personality.
Most Important Skill for your job?: Adaptability. There is something new every day
How do you become more adaptable?: The ability to be ok with not knowing. Be ok with the uncomfortable and come in with a fresh set of eyes.
Worst Thing You’ve Tasted In Your Job:
Bugs
Best Thing You’ve Tasted In Your Job: Prime Rib
Dream Job Title:
Not really a job title, but opportunities.
What Do You Think Makes a Good Job?: Good learning opportunity and to be involved in everything
Food Technologies:
Food and Future Collab
Biggest Challenge: Our Food System
Who Inspired you to get into food?: I’ve always loved food. The people who supported me were my parents and partner
Favorite Quote: Henry David Thoreau Quotes. If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.
What does that mean to you?: Dream big
Favorite Food: Japanese food, Chinese food, Pizza, Bahn Mi
Advice for anyone in your field?: Taste everything, do it with an open mind
If you were to tell yourself something in the past: Trust your gut. The right thing to do versus what you love to do

Other Links

Bluechip – big clients
Good Food Jobs Website
Chief Adventure Officer
Omnivore's Dilemma
Mike Lee – Future Earth
3 sisters Corn, Squash, Beans
Pulses

Apr 17, 2017

Louis Edmond is an extremely inspiring fellow. He has loved food his whole life and decided to be a chef, until he realized that the chef isn’t the most stable job in the world. Then he dived into the world of food science in his final semester. Though he didn’t get a food science job, he worked darn hard until 6 years later, he applied for his masters, and now works as a food technologist at Advanced Pierre Foods.

Louis’ strength is the ability to tell quite inspiring stories and he really loosens up in the final minutes of the interview, where he reminisces about his amazing week in culinary camp in high school.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Key Takeaways 

 

  • How Louis found out about Food Science and kept chasing it
  • Our discussion on a focus on customer relationship when it comes to product development
  • Why we love innovation
  • A discussion on Cardemum and Star Anise

Question Summary

One Sentence or less: I create and develop new products for food manufacturers
Where will we find the food you make?: Lots of store brands, fast fixin’s brands
Favorite Thing About Your Job: I’m still learning about meat processing and I love learning
Can You Describe The Steps of Your Career?: Culinary School, Had a food product development class in his final semester, looked into R+D Chef, Movie Set Catering Work. Hospital, Graduate School University of Georgia, Internship at McCormick,
New Orleans
What is the most important skill for your job?: Foodservice mindset: how is it going to be handled, used and consumed? Who is that person? Think of who the end-user is
My goal: Is to develop the next biggest trend
Dream Job: To be an executive
What do you look for most in a job?: Innovation and the ability to grow and develop
Examples: McCormick
Food Technology: Plant based meats; Ethnic food backgrounds such as India
Biggest Challenge the Food Industry has to face: How to transition from simple and clean to process
Who is doing the best job advocating this?: Panera
Who inspired you to get into food?: My Grandmother. A Culinary Camp in Georgia.
Bombshell quote: If you can do anything, every day, all day for free, what would it be?
Quote: Be the change you want to see in the world; Teach a man how to fish, he’ll learn how to fish forever
Book: The Aladdin Factor. “I don’t have a problem asking because I already don’t have it”. Mindset by Carol Dweck
Favorite Food: Bayona (New Orleans) – Smoked Duck and Cashew and Pepper Jelly Sandwich and Shrimp
Susan Spicer
If You were to tell your freshmen self something, what would it be?: Be more patient in going after your goals. Great things have developed with patience.

Other Links

Research Chef
Advanced Pierre Foods – Meat Division
Fried Chicken Nugget Process
Ketogenic diet
Fancy Food Show in San Francisco
Cardamom
Sriracha
Gochujang
Best Thing I Ever Ate

 

Apr 10, 2017

Today we have Julie Bernarski, Founder and President of the Healthy Crunch Company

Julie’s company makes an amazing Kale Chip product and she was so nice she sent me a whole box of it!

 

In my opinion, these are the biggest, most satisfying kale chips I’ve ever eaten. The flavors are crazy innovative and the kale is a nice, dark green.

Though we talk a lot about the product on the podcast, I feel the best takeaway advice for this product is specifically helpful if you are thinking of starting a product based business. Though the best giveaway is to love your product, also love your competitor’s products. And the more research you do with your competitors, the more of an advantage you have.

Other than that, Julie does an amazing job talking about how to Network and she lists all of the associations she’s a part of. Most of these associations are women leadership and food related. And this is an important piece of advice: that you should specialize where you network.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key Takeaways

  • The secret ingredient to great food
  • How you can improve an existing brand with your own vision
  • How a great team means everything
  • Why Julie’s team go to yoga conferences
  • Healthy Crunch is focused on food safety

Question Summary

Product: Artisan Kale Chips, Free of all major allergens
Tagline:Free of everything you don’t want, full of everything you do want
Steps in her career: Registered Dietitican to Unilever doing Regulatory (food claims, formulations) to Culinary School at New York City, worked in different restaurants, went to Toronto and wanted to start her own food business. Julie started small, and gathered interest fast

Best ways to network: Be a go getter and be confident on your product. Know your product and don’t be shy. Go to food industry events
Women in food industry management
Canadian women in food
Home Economist Association
Also: Always carry samples, live and breathe this, you give your sample to everyone and eventually it connects

Why you should buy Julie’s kale chips: Big, crunchy, and school safe
Marketing strategy: Marketing team, has amazing promotional material
Most powerful marketing tool: Instagram and trade shows (demos). You get to talk with the customer
Trade Shows in Canada: Gourmet Food and Wine Show
Why Does Your Food Job Rock?: I do so many things every day. From marketing, to production, to trade shows to convincing buyers to buy my stuff
Food Trends You’re Excited About: Getting rid of all major allergens. There’s a whole row in a grocery store that’s free of all major allergens
What’s the biggest thing the food industry has to face?: Food costs are going up
What is one thing you’d like to know more about?: How to scale up and be efficient
Who inspired you to get into food?: My parents. They worked hard. Jamie Oliver too. Julie would like to work with him
Favorite Book: I collect cookbooks all over the world
Favorite Kitchen Tool: Plastic Cutting Boards
One Meal to Eat for a Month Straight: A nice, roasted salmon
Salmon Skin
Advice for starting your own food company: Do your research. Know your category inside and out. Make a document of every kale chip in the world.
Advice for researching: Google. Go talk to retail stores and trade shows. Talk, talk talk!
What’s Next?: 2 new flavors (cucumber dill, mango jalapeno), launching into the US Spring 2017
Email: hello@healthycrunch.com healthycrunch.com

Other Links

Sunflower seeds (no allergen)
Culinary School at New York City Natural Gourmet Institute
Coconut Curry
Loblaws
Nitrogen Flush

Apr 5, 2017

Some housekeeping items before we get into this episode.

We will be going back to one episode a week starting at episode 61 to focus more time on website improvements and writing. I was fortunate to have a young food science student named Veronica Hislop reach out to me. Working together, we collaborated to make a sort of flavor article series. Check out Flavor Investigator Veronica Hislop dive into the very mysterious world of flavors, which if you are in industry, this might be beneficial for you.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students/recent graduates and employers. With a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians or R&D to Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Transcript

Today we are going to dive into the topic about switching jobs.

We as young people are in a weird situation when the topic of changing jobs pops up. Especially when you have career job and you want to switch to another career job. This is mainly because well, the people who give advice to you about switching jobs lived in a world of pensions and loyalty. Is loyalty dead in the corporate world? I’d say yes, but that’s my opinion.

I’ve helped a couple of friends walk though this transition and they talk about the questions like “people are going to see me as a job hopper” “

The best part is, I’ve done this exact same thing! I switched jobs and so have so many of our guests! Andrea Zeng, Tiffany Lau, Jocelyn Ngo, Kimber Lew to name a few. In fact, the people I mentioned had less than or around 2 years’ experience before they hopped to a different job.

So in this episode, I am going to walk through my experience in switching jobs in a lot more detail than what I’ve done before. Hopefully, I’ll be able to relieve some stress if you’re deciding to jump ship.

-------

My first job was at a granola bar factory. Then it made dog food, then it made fruit bars and then it didn’t. I don’t know what they do now.

In hindsight, the job was really tough but it solidified my work ethic and skill set.

The job paid very well and I learned a ton. With the amount of overtime I was working, I made a lot of money!

But overtime comes at a cost. It usually means no social life, or you’re too tired to do anything.

So why did I leave? A combination of things. For one, the job I applied to while working was my dream job. Something I wanted in college. Also, I really didn’t like waking up at 4:30 am and working 10 hour shifts. I think a big part (in hindsight) was my manager.

Probably the tipping point was when I disobeyed my manager and left on a vacation I had planned. It was just a day, but things didn’t go very well.

When I came back, I was taken into the office with the HR Manager and well, we had a talk. Basically, I was assigned to something called a Performance Improvement Program which is the scariest thing on earth. Basically, you have 30 days of constant monitoring to shape up or get let go.

According to the internet, the chance of actually getting fired from this is high. Some even say it’s a death sentence and you’re just biding time. So I looked for new jobs.

I won’t get into too much detail about this, but I was able to change my mindset about work and became more positive and listened to criticism. Overall, I completed the Pip program and got a bonus. Nice. However, this also showed a giant red flag: that loyalty is dead.

During my exit interview, I deduced that the PIP was basically made to figure out what the heck I was doing at this job. No one really knew my role so I didn’t do much. Once the PIP was in place, they gave me more supervisor duties with none of the credit. And that was red flag number two.

Every time I had a bad day, like managing an entire factory line by myself (even the maintenance program) or clean 100 gallons of hot syrup in a 90 degree room, I looked up jobs and just kept searching.

People were also leaving (or wanted to leave) left and right. Work got increasingly frustrating because people had their heads up their butts. But now I’m just ranting. Red flag number 3

So I hustled a bit harder. I applied to more jobs even out of state and started to volunteer at a local artisan food shop to see if I can potentially start something (I actually sold spices there for a while)

Eventually, I got a call from my current company. However, my first phone interview with my now-current manager went horribly wrong.

So I pioneered the dog biscuit line with like, 2 people. Oh, and if someone went to the dog food line, they couldn’t go back to the granola bar line., that includes Maintenance. So when something goes wrong, maintenance was very hard to reach and convince to go there. And of course, something goes wrong.

Let’s see, I came in at 4:30 am today and my phone interview was at 4pm. I thought I could make it right? Well, murphy’s law sliced through me and I had to stay for 14 hours fixing that line with minimal help.

I had to reschedule the phone interview. Luckily,  my current manager had experience with factory work so he sympathized with me and that might have also been another reason why I got the job. More on that later.

Either way, I wanted to cry that night. It was one of those days that you hated your job and wanted to run away forever. Luckily, I haven’t had one of those days in a long time.

It took about 2 months to filter through the interview process with Isagenix due to a couple of schedule conflicts on both our ends. It felt like years. I was actually in a business trip learning how to make crackers when I got the job offer. My old company was investing heavily in me to lead a new line and sent me to trainings and factory work to become a master of crackers.

So this is the dilemma: the company is investing so heavily in me that means I should stay? It’s a good rational, and a debate I had with my mentors.

The two roads were both very promising when you look at it in a bird’s eye view. I am not sure what was the biggest reason I decided to accept Isagenix. I would be sacrificing a higher pay, and a specialized skill in return for a stable office job and not much traveling (so they say as I’m writing this on a plane in Montreal).

Then I remembered the red flags and how I got that Performance Improvement Plan… as I said before kids, loyalty is dead.

After accepting the job offer, I had to wait 2 weeks back in Phoenix to get all of the paperwork scanned so I was am legitimate person. Being at my old company was brutally slow and I’ve noticed some hostility on the R+D end and the production end building up. Well, just gave me more reason to leave. After a hostile email from the head of R+D, the HR lady wanted to talk to me on how that was inappropriate of her and then I said I was leaving.

There was no counter offer, but my quality manager friend told me she was pretty upset. In fact, there were about 5 people who left in a two month span so the Phoenix plant has started to show its scars.

During the exit interview (where you need to be brutally honest on why the company sucks… which I didn’t do) I really just said that I wanted to develop products and she realized that too. However, we did have a long discussion on my manager (who apparently got fired).

My quality manager best friend congratulated me and so did some other people. The manager I worked under said maybe two words to me, and that was mainly business related. Most of the people who didn’t like me were like this.

And so after that, I bought like, 50 boxes of delicious factory cookies and went to San Luis Obispo for some weird reason.

I started my new job next week and in hindsight, I should have waited longer and enjoyed a nice vacation but I was actually excited to start my job!

I worked in Leclerc for about 1 and a half years and now it’s about 1 and a half years in isagenix. I can tell you this: I have never had a bad day at work working here. If I ever did have a bad day, I think of the worst day at the factory and shrug and smile. The hours are nice, the coworkers are very friendly and the opportunity to advance is a lot easier than in my old job.

I get to create great products and have freedom own hat to develop. I get to travel to conferences, factories, and trainings all over North America to learn how to be a better food scientist. I absolutely love it.

This was the best decision I’ve ever made.

Overall, the biggest source of advice I’ve gotten was from a combination of mentors and my dad. It’s your life, you need to realize that your whole life is NOT about the company. It’s about you.

If you get a job offer to a new company, it’s hard to embrace the change but of everyone I’ve talked to about changing jobs, it’s been worth it.

For me, changing jobs allowed me to have a much better work life balance. I also travel to really cool places and eat really good food while I’m there. The dense amount of experience I got form manufacturing gave me a useful perspective and I was able to use the skills from my previous job to become an awesome product developer.

Will Isagenix drop me? Possibly. There have been instances where I’ve messed up but the great thing about companies like Isagenix is that they have buffer money. But company loyalty still doesn’t mean anything to me. I am very grateful Isagenix has given me the opportunity to grow as a food scientist which is why I am loyal to them but I have to prepare myself. Why do you think I have this podcast?

So after this long story, I hope I can answer some questions in regards to people worrying about jumping ship on your current job. This is exactly the same ordeal I went through so in hope this helps.

Leaving with less than 2 years of experience will ruin my resume

Most HR ladies will say to stay at a company for at least 2 years. I think it’s ideal, but sometimes opportunity needs to be grabbed right away.

Tiffany Lau had the same situation when she worked for Safeway Production. It was brutal! So brutal that she quit and it was the best thing in her life.

Another thing I really want to emphasize is the importance of a tough job. Manufacturing for instance sucks. The hours are long, the people are not the brightest and you barely get free food. In exchange, you make a lot of money and become extremely valuable in the industry if you stick with it.

You should congratulate yourself for sticking with manufacturing for at least 1 year and from what I’ve been seeing, 1 year might be all you need to jump from manufacturing to Research and Development because the skillset in manufacturing is just so valuable in R and D.

So 2 years is nice, but you will know when enough is enough. If that is 1 year or 1 month, then just leave. But be smart about it, and don’t do it often.

I work with a popular person in the industry and he will defame me

We say the food industry is big, but it’s also small. People know people, yes. But that doesn’t really mean anything.

There are many factors for you not to worry about this. There’s the good way, or the bad way.

Overall, it’s really dumb, especially early in your career, to burn bridges.

What I’m saying is that try to leave your company with modesty, take your 2 weeks notice and leave a great impression on everyone. Though leaving my current job after investing maybe $5000 dollars into making me a cracker expert might have been a big F you, I made more friends than enemies in Leclerc. I think.

But when you move companies, you have to look at bigger things. If I moved from being a product developer at a whey protein company to McDonalds corporate, will people really notice who I am?

You are young, at this stage, you should not niche down. Niching down, or focusing on one very specific product (like protein bars) is for consultants and professors. Even if you know someone from that niche, it’s so easy to just hop on to something similar and increase your skill set.

You can also evaluate your brunt bridge on how him as a connection will ruin you or not.

For example, my manger worked in a spring factory. Ok right off the bat, there is a less than 1% chance I will meet him at a corporate health and wellness company.

However this has hurt me in the past as well. After I joined, I asked my old company if they wanted to make our bars. I got some cold answers…

Overall, one person will not ruin your career unless they’re like Alton Brown or something. What I can say is that the best piece of advice I have is to just simply… be better than them.

The company has does so much for me

If you’re asking this question, then you just have to weigh the pros and cons. In most situations, you might actually have the possibility to get a huge step in salary when switching jobs.

There is a huge debate about company loyalty. This is going to sound harsh, but how many years will you put in before it all crumbles down when they fire you, or lay you off, or new management doesn’t like you? Hopefully not long.

Loyalty is important. If your company is sending you to places, or is training you to do something amazing, they are investing a lot in you and does hurt them when you leave. However, the same perspective can work too. If you make the company a million dollars, they can probably drop you because you cost too much.

This is a huge gray area for me, but I hope these drastic scenarios give you some perspective on whether or not you think loyalty is dead.

Should I wait until I don’t have a job to start looking?

No. You are deemed much more valuable when you are employed and your stress level will be a lot less when you apply for jobs while working. My advice for this is to apply for jobs when you have a REALLY BAD day at work.

When I had my bad 14 hour days, I just slumped down, looked at my ugly face when my computer is loading and started typing in food science jobs and went to town.

In most situations, the state of not having money and trying to live will make your job search unsatisfying and potentially desperate. Your chances of ending up in another unsatisfying job is pretty high.

If you get fired, or laid off, or you got so mad, you threw sharp objects at your boss and left, then you are at a different situation.

I would contact your support network (husband or wife, mentor, family, etc) and let them support you emotionally and financially so you can go 100% on finding the next job

If you have none of those worst case scenario? Just send me an email and I’ll see what I can do.

This is a more rhetorical question: What’s better, being in one company for 30 years of 6 companies 5 years each?

This depends on so many things.

Accomplishments and achievements and the ability to transform your company or department will always give you more points than just slapping a year and what you do.

However, I lean more on having working through a diverse array of companies. I think the best example I can give is my current Chief Science Officer. He’s been in several companies but he was able to create a lot of money for the company in the years he’s worked there. In almost 1 billion in value, there’s the reason he’s Chief.

I think if you have the ability to connect the dots between the companies you’ve worked for and see a common thread of success and reproduce it, then you nailed it. It is inevitable that if you plan to climb the corporate ladder, you will be dealing or managing people. Once you realize that people are truly the same in every company (i.e. they just want to feel valued, and know that they matter), then you can make gold.

Apr 3, 2017

Today we feature Michael Kalanty, who is a man of many talents. And you learn why that’s the case.

This interview is very well, timeline heavy. You learn step by step and the twists and turns between being an architecture student, chef, pastry chef, bread author, and lastly, consultant. You will learn the key points on how these happen and the catalysts that make Mike what he is today.

What I love in this interview is the twist and turns throughout his life. I really dug in deep on his career path. Questions like Why did he switch into food, why did he decide to write a book, how hard it was to make a book….

And most of all, you’ll learn the best, most tangible advice on how to make good bread.

About Michael

Before Michael Kalanty served as Director of Education for the California Culinary Academy (“CCA”) in San Francisco from 1996 to 2000, he’d already built and sold a successful catering business and pastry shop in his native Philadelphia. While developing the artisan bread course for the Baking & Pastry Program at the CCA, he fell under the spell of yeast. He returned to the kitchen and has been teaching, writing, and baking bread ever since.

He wrote his first book, How To Bake Bread: The Five Families of Bread®, in 2009 “because there wasn’t a detailed book for culinary students that was written in a student-friendly style.” The book went on to win the Gourmand Award for Best Bread Book in the World at the Paris Cookbook Fair the following year.

It’s been adapted by hundreds of culinary schools across the country, most notably the Art Institute which has 42 campuses nationwide. It’s been translated into Brazilian Portuguese and is the standard text for professional culinary schools in Brazil.

Michael’s track record in Bakery Innovation dates back to when the field was merely called product development. Many of his formulas for breads, crackers, and cookies can be found on grocery store shelves for clients like Pepperidge Farm and General Mills.

He works with Clean Label initiatives to create healthy food choices that maximize flavor. Google Campus serves one of his gluten-free cookies.

Michael is a certified master taster and licensed sensory panel moderator. He helps food innovation teams work effectively with consumer research to develop flavor and texture profiles that define food brands. As a teaching tool for his clients, he developed the “Aroma & Flavor Wheel for Bread”, for which he holds the copyright.

He speaks often at conferences and seminars. His report on bakery trends, “What Is Up with Bread!”, is a mainstay on event programs for the International Association of Cooking Professionals and the American Culinary Federation.

Michael lives in San Francisco. He’s taught baking courses across the U.S., in France, Italy, Germany, and Brazil. He teaches hands-on classes at the San Francisco Cooking School and several cooking schools in the Bay Area. How To Bake MORE Bread: Modern Breads/Wild Yeast is his second book.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students/recent graduates and employers. With a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians or R&D to Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. You’ll see an amazing new website in Spring 2017. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key Takeaways

  • How Gothic architecture made him fall in love with bread
  • How hard work and passion is noticeable to chefs
  • The journey of making a book
  • How a book can make a great business card

Question Summary

One Sentence: I teach people how to bake bread
What’s the most interesting place you’ve taught people to bake bread?: Paris cookbook fair. Mike’s book won 2011’s award: How to Bake Bread
Steps to take to where you are today: Mathematician to Architecture to Chef to Pastry Chef, to Author to Consultant
Did you take any formal education?: No
What age did you switch to food?: 26 or so
What year did you decide to write a book?: 2000. The “end of the world” made him think about his goals in life. One of them was to write a book.
Brazillian Breakfast: Espresso and Asprin
Artisan bakers in the Bay Area
Was it hard to make a book?: It took 10 years for me to make a book. I would never discourage anyone from writing a book because you can learn about yourself.
My Food Job Rocks: I can do a lot of cool projects
New Food Trends and Technologies: Clean Label
Tips on making good bread: Make one recipe for a year. You learn how it behaves differently in different environments
French Country Bread: Pan de Compania
What’s one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about: Working with Herloom Grains. Grinding grains fresh
Favorite Kitchen Item: My hands
Favorite Book: The World According to Garp
Any Advice for anyone to get into the culinary field: We work hard, we sweat
Where can we find you next?:  Going to Boston next.
New book: How to Bake More Bread

Other Links

Baking bread in a Dutch Oven
Grocery Store Delivery
Cricket protein Powders
Digital Scale
Brown Rice Syrup
Brown Rice Syrup Powder/Flour
Bean to Bar Chocolate

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