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My Food Job Rocks!

There is very little awareness of what the people in the food industry actually do. This stems back to the lack of knowledge and awareness of the range of degree courses and programs available that will equip them for a career in food. My FoodJobRocks! by Adam Yee is the first podcast of its kind that allows listeners to hear directly from people who are in the food industry and have a passion for what they do. They share how they became involved in food and describe what it is they do, plus a few more fun questions just to keep things entertaining. Listen to them here, and stay tuned for a new episode every Monday.
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Now displaying: May, 2017
May 29, 2017

We have quite a unique guest today. Alex Oesterle co-owns his own creative agency, Blue Bear Creative in Boulder, Colorado. His client base is food companies where he creates marketing campaigns for food companies that target the good old millennial population.

What’s great about Alex is that he also hosts his own podcast. He created Food Marketing Nerds, a podcast focusing solely on food marketing professionals. So of course, we talk a lot about podcasting and how it benefitted our professional lives. We also discuss what makes a good podcast and how to get guests.

If you want to get started with Alex’s podcast, I suggest checking out these three episodes.

Other than that, if you are interested in marketing, or branding, this podcast brings a lot of really good strategies on the table. For example, so many different marketing strategies including snapchat, Tasty videos, and choosing your niche

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key Takeaways

  • Why Boulder, Colorado is an amazing food entrepreneur place
  • Why mellenials don’t like “Why mellenials” articles
  • Why Alex and I love Podcasting
  • How snap chat is used in the food media space?
  • Really interesting discussion about Wendy’s social media strategy

Question Summary

What is Blue Bear Creative?: We are a creative agency that focuses on millennials in the creative agency
What is the best thing about your job?: The creative work
What is the worst thing about your job?: The admin work
Steps: College at CU Boulder, various job and internships at Qudoba, worked at restaurants in college, went into Finance, did Finance in startups, met cofounder and their skills aligned
How do millennials like to be marketed?: They don’t like to be in a statistic. Example: Pepsi Ad
Why Did you Make A Podcast?: To capture knowledge in how to make us better than our job
How has podcasting benefitted you and your brand?: Personally, it’s shown me how to be successful and I get to see different marketing strategies
How do you usually contact guests?: We reach out to brands that are really cool (I use linkedin)
What do you think makes a great interview podcast?: Being able to spitball and roll with ideas and knowledge in the industry. Have the hosts do their research. I look for tactical information
What Brands are Killing it Right Now?: Justin’s Nut Butter, all of Alex’s guests, Chick-Fil-E, Taco Bell
What Food Technologies are Really Exciting you Right Now?: Messaging and tracking data
Tasty Style Videos
Rogue Wendy’s Account
As a business, what is one thing in the food industry you’d like to know more about?: How a big food company without outside help made it
Favorite Book: Malcom Gladwell’s Blink
Favorite Quote: Man in the Arena

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

Any advice about starting a Creative Agency: Start small. Have a specialty or expertise
What’s next and where can we find you?: Continue to grow. We’re growing.

Other Links


Blue Bear Creative Website

Denver Colorado
Boulder is the Silicon Valley of Natural Products
Boulder Chip brand
Expo West
Naturally Boulder
Time Article about Millennials
Fat Burning Man Podcast
Throwing Shade
Audible
Food Marketing Nerds
Denver Convention Center: Blue Bear Statue

May 22, 2017

Today we have Jonathon Weber on the show, a young professional who works at Herbaland Naturals, a gummy company in Vancouver, Canada.

Jonathon just graduated but he’s worked for so many companies! He also has chef experience, and now he’s a food technologist. This guy is really passionate on what he does. If you are currently in college. Really listen to the part about how he gets internships

Other gems in this episode, is that you learn a little bit about the gummy industry, learn how to hustle in college and do internships for small companies, and Jonathon and I geek out about ethnic food which includes talking about Dominican food, Banh Mi sandwiches, monte cristo sandwiches, and my spring fling, gochujang

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Key Takeaways

- Why Jonathon changed his route in food science
- How Jonathon got 3 internships while in college
- Jonathon and my talk about ideation to commercialization
- Our discussion on a lot of different ethnic food

Question Summary


Pitch Question: I’m a food technologist in the gummy industry
What’s the best thing about your job?: I solve problems
Did you learn about gummies in school?: No, I learned it at work
Pre-gel
How would you tell a freshman how to make gummies?: It’s simple: a matrix, a sugar and water. Everything else can alter it like pH or other sugars can change it
When finding these internships, how did you find them?: I had to cold call them and ask to join, and asked to grow together
Most Important Skill Do You Need For you Job?: Organic Chemistry and people skills
What Would Be Your Dream Job title?: Culinary Cowboys
What do you look for most in a  job?: Room for growth, is there support? Are they open minded? Small Companies are cool because you wear so many different hats
Food Trends and Technology: Plant based everything
Biggest challenge the food industry has to face?: The food we’re making is sustainable
Who inspired you to get into food?: My mother
Favorite meal from my mom: Braised beef and beans (recipe here)
Favorite Book: The Count of Monte Cristo
Favorite Quote: Keep growing, exploring, have fun, learn something new every day, and above all, be yourself
Favorite Kitchen Knife: My mercer
Tips for sharpening knives: practice. Use a sharpening stone
Favorite Food: Banh Mi
Weird stuff in Banh Mi
Any advice to get into the food industry: Work hard, never give up, be active, network, try new things, taste everything
If you were to tell one thing about your freshman self, what would it be?: follow your instincts, ask more questions, spend more time with professors, and you have to be having fun

Other Links

Soda Scientist Haley Richardson
Niagara College culinary and food technology
Culinary Scientists
Provisions Food Company Savory Cookies and Condiments
Black River Juice Co – Ontario
Ideation to Commercilization
Pea protein gummy
Plant based burger that bleeds
Plant based fried chicken
Monte Cristo
Knife sharpening stone
Vancouver
Hoisin Sauce
Gochujang
Siracha

May 15, 2017

I am so excited to have Sapna Thottahil join me today.

Sapna has an amazing background. From her early days in food waste to her fullbright scholarship Indian Organic Farming, Sapna is very passionate on the current issues in food that are just starting to get our attention.

With a  good heart, she now has a job as a Supply Chain Specialist at School Food Focus where she manages the supply chain for all ingredients that goes to feed schools in California.

So not only do we discuss one of the most important (yet not well talked about) careers in the food industry, but we also get into a lot of other really cool things such as whether to buy local, or fair trade, the cool things happening in the school food space, and an excellent tip on how to make your own vanilla extract.

hat’s the end of the show everyone, if you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

About Sapna

This excerpt was copied from her website

Sapna E. Thottathil, PhD is a first generation Indian American and the author of India’s Organic Farming Revolution: What it Means for Our Global Food System. She is passionate about finding solutions to global health and environmental problems and has over 10 years of experience in international development, environmental resource management, and food and agriculture.

Sapna is currently a Supply Chain Specialist at School Food Focus, where she develops opportunities with food companies interested in supplying better K-12 public school food.

She has worked on environmental policy and climate change for multiple organizations, including the Environmental Protection Agency and Health Care Without Harm, and has contributed to several articles on sustainable meat procurement, featured in Civil Eats and the American Journal of Public Health.

She earned her BA from the University of Chicago, where she was awarded the Udall Scholarship for environmental leadership, before going on to receive an MSc from Oxford University and a PhD in Geography from the University of California at Berkeley, where she was the recipient of a Fulbright fellowship. She currently sits on the Board of Pesticide Action Network, serves as a Council Member for Oakland Food Policy Council, is on the National Advisory Council for the Women, Food and Agriculture Network, and is a Health Equity Expert with the Center for Global Policy Solutions. 

In her spare time, she enjoys cooking, gardening, hiking, identifying wildflowers and birds, and relearning how to play the piano. She is also working on another book.

Sapna lives in Oakland, California with her husband and son.

Key Takeaways

  • What Supply Chain does
  • Our discussion on buying local versus buying fair trade
  • Why cafeterias are starting to cook raw chicken
  • Sapna’s top 3 spices

Question Summary

What is your definition of Supply Chain?: Logistics between production and consumption
Do you buy fair trade or local?: Farmers all around need our support
Steps to get to where you are today: Office of Solid Waste to Oxford University in England, UC Berkeley PhD, Fullbright Scholarship to India, published a book, School food procurement
What Claims do you look for on School Food Focus: Healthy ingredients, ingredient guide is posted on school food focus
What should young people be doing for their job?: Never stop learning
What unusual class did you take to help you at your job?: Science and Environmental Issues
My Food Job Rocks: I work for a mission focused organization with people who want to change the world
Food Trends and Technology: Cafeterias are buying raw chicken and cooking it in house. Transparency in food
Challenges in the Food Industry: Food Waste and ironically people are hungry. Supply Chain is full of inefficiencies
Who is doing a good job fixing this?: Plant based food companies
How do you get on Non-Profit Boards?: It’s like applying for a job. Networking and know the right people
Who Inspired You to get into food?: Consumers and my mother
Favorite Kitchen Item: Spices. Spice Cabinet
Top 3 Spices: Coriander, basil, vanilla
Vanilla extract tip: Cheap vodka, great vanilla beans
Any advice for anyone going into the food industry: Read on the sector, Check out these really cool podcasts (MFJR), Network,
What’s next?: Sapna is making a new book
Sapna kerala at wordpress.com

Other Links

School Food Focus
Raw Materials
Distributors
Pesticide Action Network
Food Miles
Fair Trade
Cal Poly Chocolates
Value-added goods
Kerala India
Southern Indian Cuisine
Civil Eats
Comfood

 

May 8, 2017

In this episode we have Dan Follese, the owner of Follese Culinary Consulting, where he goes to clients with the latest trends and brings new innovative concepts to life.

Dan’s main clients are fast food companies and we go through a lot of talk about how he views new trends and his opinion on certain fast food restaurants. For example: a debate on which is better: taco bell or Chipotle.

But this is a really fun episode. Dan is a wealth of knowledge and we talk about amazing resources to make you more innovative. For example, he’s told me research programs I’ve never thought of, how to communicate better as a food science person, and just his experiences as a chef, food photographer, and consultant were really a treat to hear.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

About Dan

With nearly 30 years in the business of preparing food, Chef Dan has forged his own path to create a robust background unlike any others. Chef Dan brings vision of collaboration, innovation and on trend concepts steeped in classic culinary ideology that will make your consumers crave more. An extremely motivated and detail-oriented culinary professional with diverse and progressive experience in multiple environments. Chef Dan has prepared white cloth gourmet meals for celebrities, appearances on “Best of Wine & Food” TV Food Network, collaborates alongside food scientists, converts recipes to formulas for mass production, leads nationwide food trend tours, directly supports onsite sales & has created some of today’s biggest LTO’s. Having worked directly with some of the largest food manufacturers he understands the necessities in food production. A Minnesota native Chef Dan has worked and traveled his way around the globe. Spending nearly thirty years in South Florida where he met his wife. They have settled down for the simple life of Green Bay, Wisconsin where they raise their family. Chef Dan’s passion for food and beverage will translate into your Gold Standard of success

Key Takeaways

- The Big 3 Fast food empires
- Olive Garden used to make their own pasta
- Why we need Cheese Experts
- The sad story about people stealing steaks in restaurants
- Dan’s opinion on taco’s à Taco Bell versus Chipotle

Question Summary

What do you tell them in a sentence or less: I create concepts out of food products for mass or restaurant chains. I work for all sorts of companies including start ups and kitchen manufacturers
Background: Chef, Johnson and Wales, Food Styling and Photography
How long did you get into full-time consulting?: Most people in the culinary field don’t know about commercialization. Culinary schools are now teaching food science
How to Start Consulting: Answer good basic, culinary trade information
Most food has already existed, but you have to evaluate how the customer will react to it
What should young people do to be good at their job?: You have to do what you love
Why are restaurant fail rates so high?: The dream and glamour can go to your head
Staff steal steaks from restaurants all the time
My Food Job Rocks: I get to experiment with new food ideas and implement them to large companies
How to Find and implement new trends:

Look at local markets
See the hottest restaurants on yelp and see what they do
More importantly, what appeals to me?

How to train sales people on new products: Demonstrate the simplicity of the product. The top 3 items comparing why it’s different, very basic applications
Most Food Scientists don’t want to be customer facing
Food Trends and Technology: Health and Wellness: Gluten-Free
Biggest Challenge the Food Industry has to face: Food Safety
One thing in the food industry you’d like to know about?: Food Science!; Cannabis in the Food Industry
Inspired to Get into Food: A Restaurant Job in high school
How do you get promoted?: Be someone to show up for any task asked for them. The spirit.
Favorite Book: Le Repertoire De La Cuisine
Favorite Quote: If there's time to lean there’s time to clean
Favorite Food: My wife says pizza but I say Chimichanga
Taco Bell vs Chipotle
Any advice for anyone in the food industry?: Love food
What’s Next? Where can we find you?: Trade Shows
Expo West
IFT17
I go and represent customers

Kitchen Aid stand mixer
Data-Central
Technomics
Mintel
Smoked Gouda
Arby’s Smoked Gouda special
Snacking Innovation Summit – Food Navigator
McDonalds
Burger King
Wendy’s
Big Mac into 3 different version
Culinology
Cargill
American Cheese
Jackfruit
Sunflower Seeds and Butter
Pea Protein
Whey protein
Naked Chicken Chalupa

May 1, 2017

It was an honor interviewing Susie Wyshak, author of Good Food Great Business as she shows us so many useful tips on how to start a food business and how to write a book.

I actually was able to meet Susie for a brief time during my trip to the Fancy Food Show, which we talk about during the episode. She even signed my copy of Good Food Great Business and you can see it in the show notes.

If you haven’t read the book and you are looking to start a food business, I highly suggest this one. It’s so good! From personal experience, I found the resources so valuable, the format really easy to follow, and the examples are superb.

Other little gems in this episode includes great tips and tribulations of writing a book, me showing off my food science knowledge, and Susie’s thoughts on robots in the future.

About Susie

Susie Wyshak is the author of Good Food, Great Business: How to Take Your Artisan Food Concept From Idea to Marketplace and Chocolate Chip Cookie School, for kids. She blogs about trends at FoodStarter.com and offers strategy and naming services to sustainable food entrepreneurs, local food shops and other small businesses.

Key Takeaways

  • Why Susie’s book is amazing
  • Why she decided to make a book and some tips on doing it
  • What Susie thinks of robots
  • Adam talks about food science and inulin

Question Summary

Educational Background: MBA in Marketing

Tips on writing a book

How did you contact people for info?: I just asked them! But I had a strong network
Do you think the industry is small?: Yes, but it’s just like any industry
What is the hardest thing about writing a book?: Books are linear and writing about a non-linear process is very challenging
How long did it take you to write the book?: Always had the idea, met Chronicle books the following year, then took a couple years.
Having deadlines will get you to focus. It’s like doing a Marathon. Be flexible and not be frustrated.Edits were mainly about Clarifying and explaining things. Thanks to her publisher
What has been the benefit of publishing the book?: I can do what I wanted and work who I wanted to work with
What would you eat for a month straight?: Lebanese Grape leaves stuffed with rice and lamb
Do you have any advice for writing a book: Read a book about writing books

My Food Job Rocks: I can help people and I have a community
Food Trends and Technology: Single serving on-the-go foods
What do you feel nailed single-serve foods?: That’s It – 2 piece fruits
Biggest challenge in the food industry: immigration and food waste
Susie’s thought on robots: It’s complicated and conflicting. We need to think through it.
What’s one thing in the food industry would you like to know more about?: food processing
Who inspired you to get into food?: An appreciation to small farmers
Favorite Book: Harold McGee On Food and Cooking
What would you eat for a month straight?: Lebanese Grape leaves stuffed with rice and lamb
Do you have any advice for writing a book: Read a book about writing books
What’s Next?: A new book about a grocery store, going to the Natural Products Expo
Where can we find you?: Susie@foodstarter.com

What other food shows do you recommend?
Fancy Food Show – Winter Summer
New Hope Natural Products Expo – LA and Baltimore
Candy Association
Specialty Coffee Association

Other Links

Fancy Food Show
Hummus Stir – Top food pick
Portable coffee tablet – tierra nueva
Good Food Great Business
Foodzie – Marketplace for Artisan food
Pierto’s Principle: 80 / 20 rule
Foodstarter.com – Susie’s own website
New Amazon Store
Meal Kits
Chipotle
Chicory Root - Inulin
Food Safety Modernization Act
The Joy of Cooking
Alice Medrich
Baking with Julia
Scissors that have two knife blades
Microplane Zester
Coffee Grinder
Spice Grinder

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