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My Food Job Rocks!

There is very little awareness of what the people in the food industry actually do. This stems back to the lack of knowledge and awareness of the range of degree courses and programs available that will equip them for a career in food. My FoodJobRocks! by Adam Yee is the first podcast of its kind that allows listeners to hear directly from people who are in the food industry and have a passion for what they do. They share how they became involved in food and describe what it is they do, plus a few more fun questions just to keep things entertaining. Listen to them here, and stay tuned for a new episode every Monday.
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Now displaying: July, 2017
Jul 31, 2017

This episode is all about Fair Trade, you’ll not only learn about Equifruit’s focus on bananas, but also what other products can be fair trade, awesome resources in the fair-trade industry, and things of that nature.

Kim herself is an expert salesperson. Ever since she was 18 years old, she learned to go out and sell, and we talk over her expert techniques and here’s a secret… it’s all about perspective.

Also to note is Kim’s philosophy in life. She’s had so many jobs but because she loved what she did, and that opened more and more opportunities in her life. Something to think about.

So in this episode, you’ll learn where bananas come from, how a diamond ring can be fair trade, and how to be an amazing sales person

About Kim

Kim is a native Montrealer with a passion for all things food.  She graduated from Concordia University with a degree in Psychology and pursued further education at St. Pius X Culinary Institute, where she attained a diploma in French cuisine.  Kim has worked in sales from the start of her career: restaurant, retail, spa industry, catering and now, Fairtrade bananas!

Kim joined Equifruit as sales manager in late 2014.  After nearly 15 years of sales experience, she wanted to be more connected on a social justice level.  She loves the challenge of convincing Canadian customers to put farmers first.  Kim brings to the table relentless optimism, contagious enthusiasm and an irrevocable passion for fair trade.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Housekeeping

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • Where fair trade bananas come from
  • How everything can be fair trade
  • How fair trade funds farmer’s kids with money

Question Summary

What do you tell people you do?: Exotic fair trade fruit saleswoman. A light intro on fair trade
Fair Trade: Doing business on fair terms. The producer gets paid properly.
When I was 18 years old: Sales as B2B. Cold calling. Selling a product from door to door
How did you put yourself out there when finding your next gig?: Social media
How to be a good sales person: A really good salesperson reads people well. Everything from the tone of your voice to the language
Does good sales people come from books or experience?: It might be more innate than you think. You can develop a salesperson, but you have to be perceptive. An introvert can be a salesperson
Food Trends and Technologies: Purchasing habits of Bananas. People are buying products because of the value of the products
Where do you find your sales research?: Canadian Government Websites
Who inspired you to get into food?: My family
Career path: I study the things I find interesting. You have to love what you do, but there will be challenges. Ask the questions: what would you do for free? Or what excites you?
Kitchen Item: I’m a knife snob. I have to carry my knives for vacation
Advice for a Sales Job: Ask to be paired to an expert salesperson
Favorite Food: Salad and fresh fruits. I would wait for the seasons to enjoy my fruit
Advice about life: It’s more important to love what you do because it opens up amazing opportunity. You’ll be a happier human being.
Equifruit.com
Equifruit Twitter
Equifruit Instagram
Equifruit facebook
Equifruit linkedin

Other Links

Fairtrade Canada
Fairtrade.net
Canadian Fairtrade network
Guelph Organic Tradeshows
Canadian Produce Marketing Association
Fair Trade Chocolate, Sugar, Tea
Fair Trade cotton shirt
Fairtrade Diamond Ring
Farm and Food Care
BA Psychology Concordian University
Saint Pious the 10th – Culinary School
Catering Company
Fighting the Banana Wars Harriett Lam
Social introvert
Good survey about personalities
Neilson

 

Jul 24, 2017

Food Law is one of those topics I fell asleep at in college. But it wasn’t until working in the industry did I find just how important it really is.

If you’ve been a fan of this podcast, you might have heard my frustrations learning about how the Europeans deal with GMOs. If you’re a first time listener, I’ll talk about it again.

But Ceasare Varallo is the man when it comes to making me excited about food law. He’s a lawyer in Italy who focuses on such things as food fraud, regulatory compliance, and communicating crises.

This is an amazing interview all about being a food lawyer. You’ll learn how to get a job in regulatory, how to get people to trust you as an expert and the amazing food technologies Cesare’s really into. One in particular that I haven’t heard of until recently… block chain technology

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or write a review on itunes. It helps wonders.

I am also inviting you to sign up on our email list at myfoodjobrocks.com. I am doing this new thing called the 5 course meal where I send you 5 pieces of hand picked content and deliver it every Friday morning. Like a meal kit…

If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • Ceasare’s work is three fold: food safety, regulatory, and managing communication
  • How Ceasare found his niche in food law
  • Why regulatory is getting more and more important
  • The interesting things about food marketing
  • How to learn more about food regulatory

Question Summary

Introduction in a sentence or less?: I’m a food lawyer. I help food companies to reach the compliance
Cesare started with commodities at first and then went to more complicated things later
Steps it took to get to where you are today: Criminal lawyer, switched law firm and found food clients. Noticed about the specific type of advice
Foodlawlatest.com

Blogging advice
If you have good content, it will be successful
Avoid scandal or “fake news”, give useful facts
Interacting with your audience is super important

What’s the most important skill you need for your job?: How you communicate and interact with people
How do you get people to trust you more?: A blog with good content is a sign of trust, facts are a sign of trust, showing that you really know what you’re talking about. Keep on delivering good content and make them comfortable.The customer today is much more informed
Customers are reading more food labels and are willing to spend good, safe, tasty and authentic food.
Food Technology: Smart Agriculture, Drones, Artificial Intelligence to spot food safety issues, block chains,
Block Chain: Technology used to secure the financial transactions: bitcoins/ cryptocurrency. Will help food fraud a lot.
Biggest Challenge the food industry needs to face: Fraudulence and trust. Big companies are not trusted. Local is more trusted. A small minority has a lot of power
What is something you would like to know more about?: Marketing. How much work it takes to do marketing campaigns. How do you make things Viral?
Favorite Book: Lord of the Rings
Favorite Quote: Winston Churchill: success consists of going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm
Favorite Kitchen Item: My favorite dish is risotto so I like a really big wooden spoon

If anyone wanted a job in regulatory, what should they study on their own?: You can find many courses in food law in United States. California and New York has plenty
Study the objective official source depending on countries. Common websites.
FDA website, Code of Federal Regulations
Not so simple in Europe: 26 countries with deviations
Independent blogs can work too

Advice getting into the food regulatory industry: Get your hands dirty. You can’t imagine the complexity with regulatory issues. It’s more about how you approach the problem
Where can we find you?: Foodlawlatest@gmail.com

Other Links

Foodlawlatest.com
Baby formula scandal
Olive Oil Book: Extra Virginity
Anti-Vaxxers
“We don’t trust science but everyone is eating supplements”
Viral Marketing
Coca-cola put names on the cans, and they monitor and test everything
Food Marketing Nerds Podcast

Jul 17, 2017

What’s the point of a food industry podcast if I can’t help you with your careers?

That’s why I’ve actually taken a liking on interviewing recruiters because recruiters know the best way to get a job.

Bob Pudlock is one of those people. He is an independent recruiter who knows his stuff. Taking an unconventional route, Bob went into recruiting because companies would pay him top dollar to recruit. Yep, one sentence solidified his career.

Bob has a lot of practical advice in the show such as how to make 100% use of job interviews when you have to pay for your own flight, the power of long-term networking, and one of my favorite topics, which is better? Factory experience or a master’s degree?

Shownotes: http://myfoodjobrocks.com/075Bob

About Bob Pudlock

Bob Pudlock is the owner and President of Gulf Stream Search, an executive search firm that works with companies in the food and nutritional supplement industries to identify, assess and capture top talent for their organizations.

Bob has been in the search industry for 17 years - he has placed individuals all throughout the US and Caribbean at all levels - most of the positions he fills are in R&D, Quality, Sales/Marketing, and Plant Operations throughout the US - he works with venture capital firms that focus on the food industry, start-ups, as well as established brands in the food and supplement industries.

Bob grew up in Cleveland, OH and attended John Carroll University where he played on the golf team.  He moved to South Florida in 2011 and is active outdoors with running, swimming, stand-up paddle board racing, fishing and bicycling.

5 top reasons My Food Job Rocks

1. I can work from anywhere - I conduct nearly all of my work via phone, email, and video.

2. I choose what companies, searches, and candidates I work with.

3. I make my own hours - I work as much or as little as I like - although my business demands a lot of my time, I still have the flexibility and control over my schedule to do the things I enjoy outside with the people close to me.

4. I control my income.

5. I get to work with up and coming talent in the food industry and I also get to work with companies that are changing the way we look at nutrition and health in general.  I get to work with people that are truly making a difference in the world.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

 

If you like what you heard, like us on facebook or set a review on itunes. It helps wonders. If you have any questions or suggestions on how to improve the podcast, don’t be afraid to email me at podcast@myfoodjobrocks.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • How to make the most of paying to fly to a job interview
  • Why you should go to hiring managers and not HR
  • How even the smallest talks can be impactful
  • The value of factory experience
  • The many factors about the lack of free labor

Question Summary

Sentence or less: I identify or recruit top talent in the food industry
What do you do specifically?: 2 things: companies go to him to find people and he finds great people
I focus on relationships and connecting
What was the time you talked to someone who didn’t accept the job at the time?: I try to open up to people to imagine the possibilities. I try to set more expectations.
What’s the best advice for growing your network?: Throw your net wide, not deep
The best thing about your job: The journey of hiring
Steps it took to get to where you are today: Ohio, Private schools, good at sports, underachiever, didn’t think what would happen when he grew up, golf coach, training salesmen, “Bob, we will pay you top dollar to find salespeople”, pet food recruiting, then expanded to more - Sometimes it’s ok not to know what you’re going to do
What’s the most common theme between excellent candidates?: For young people: curiosity for learning and getting to really understand all the different steps on the product development cycle
What is more valuable? Masters experience or Factory experience?: Factory experience. It can’t be replaced or supplemented at a later date.
For many people, most people want to do different things
Why Does Your Food Job Rock?:
It’s all about the journey. Also, I work for myself and I get to have control over who I work with
What is Bob’s Win Rate (Hired versus not hired): Average is 10-15 interviews for one hire. Bob has had impressive numbers. The secret is understand what the company is looking for
Food Trends and Technologies: The blurred lines between mainstream food and nutrition
What is the biggest challenge the food industry needs to face?: Skilled labor. Some reasons: we put our manufacturing plants in the middle of nowhere, lobbying to reduce regulations for hiring skilled labor.
Favorite Quote: The Man in the Arena.
Favorite Book: Oh the Places You’ll Go
Favorite Kitchen Utensil: Utensils that are not utensils
Advice on the food industry: If you’re going technical, get a degree. Think of other degrees like Masters or MBAs
What is a common myth that you’d like to dispel about job hunting?: The best resume doesn’t always win
Where can we find you?: Gulf Stream Search. Email: bob.pudlock@gulfstreamsearch.com
Phone number: 561-450-9490

Other Links

Hiring Manager – Someone who requests a new employee
H1B Visa

Jul 10, 2017

Steve Gendel has worked in the FDA for 25 years and this guy has had an amazing career doing so.

He’s been involved in the latest and greatest technologies ranging from early stage GMOs, Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, and of course, our favorite one right now, FSMA.

The best part of this episode is the very practical and real advice he give son how to get a job at the FDA. Of course, it’s a special mix of fiscal year luck, and who you know. He tells you the best places to meet people in the FDA, where the FDA usually works at (which of course, it’s not easy find), and when to start asking your contacts if there are positions open.

 http://myfoodjobrocks.com/074Steven

About Steven M. Gendel, Ph.D.

Dr. Gendel works to ensure safe food for everyone through education, consulting, and support of food manufacturers and organizations of all sizes as the Vice President, Division of Food Allergens, IEH Laboratories and Consulting Group. This includes facilitating compliance with the rules issued under the Food Safety Modernization Act, and supporting the development of Hazard Assessments and Food Safety Plans. He applies a scientifically sound approach to allergen control and testing, and to resolving compliance issues.  He is a Food Safety Preventive Control Alliance Preventive Controls Lead Trainer, a Certified Food Scientist, and an experienced speaker.  Previously he was the Food Allergen Coordinator for the US Food and Drug Administration where he lead policy initiatives, the development of regulatory documents, and assisted in enforcement activities.  He has over 25 years of experience in food safety science and policy and over 90 techincal publications. He held postdoctoral positions at Harvard University and the University of Toronto and was on the faculty of the Department of Genetics at Iowa State University before joining the FDA.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • Steve talks about why he stayed in the FDA for 25 years
  • How the FDA is funded
  • What the FDA controls
  • What Steve thinks has the best food safety programs
  • The best advice on how to get into the FDA
  • When to start looking for a FDA job

Question Summary

One sentence or less: I’m a food safety scientist. My job is the next thing you eat will not kill you
Best thing about your job: I feel like I’m really making the world safer
Step to get to where you are today: Undergraduate degree in engineering in KS Western reserve , Graduate in UC Irvine in biology, Department of Genetics in Iowa University, met someone at FDA which was now Institute of Food Safety and Health, stay with the FDA for 25 years, now a consultant

What is the difference between the FDA then and now?: A lot of external factors shape the projects such as consumer, laws and regulations, and new congressional turnover
The hot topic before you left: FSMA is coming into effect (well…. Maybe not anymore)
Most important skill you can have in food safety: Flexibility. Food safety is a very integrative type of field. There are a lot of pieces in Food Safety.

Projects Steve was involved in:

  • Potential allergens in GMOs (back when it was new)
  • Risk analysis modeling
  • Joint project between FDA and Health Canada about Soft-cheeses and L.monocytogenes
  • Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act. Thresholds for Allergens
  • Lead author of an allergen threshold report
  • Helped with FSMA’s preventative control

New Food Trends and Tech: Advanced Genome Technologies. Can be a great tool to understand pathogens. It helps you understand where they come from and then we can do that
Biggest Challenge the Food Industry has to face: Transparency. Mainly asking “why”
One thing you’d like to know more about: How companies invest in food safety and food safety program
Favorite Quote: To err is human but to really mess up, you need a computer
Favorite Food: Grilled Cheese Sandwich. Sharp Cheddar, Swiss Cheese, Artisanal Food
What Advice Would You Give TO Work In The FDA: At this particular time in history, it’s hard to say. However, meet people in the FDA. It’s who you know.

How to meet FDA people: Scientific Conferences. Local meetings at IFT and IAFP, American Chem Society, Society of Toxicology, talk to them, they will know others who do.
USAjobs.com
Office of Regulatory Affairs. There are District Offices. Contact the Deputy Director of that office
Commissioner’s Fellowship
ORISE- Oakridge
CIFSAN – Centers for Food Safety in Universities that work collaboratively. Can get graduate or postdoc positions
Fiscal Year for the Federal Government: Begins October 1st, ends October 1st. But start looking now
How to find Steve: linkedin

Other Links

Ep. 031 - Tiffany Lau
Myrian Zboraj – Quality Assurance Magazine
GATTACA
Walmart
Costco

 

Jul 3, 2017

Darin’s son died of an E.coli outbreak and he has spent the last 25 years devoting his life to making the world a safer place.

Within the last 25 years, he’s become a Doctorate in Law and Policy where his main focus is to implement Food Policy. He’s talked with doctors, scientists, law makers, and graduate students into fighting for food safety. In his spare time, he comforts people who have gone through the same troubles as he has, and shares their stories.

Darin does a great job weaving intricate stories to give you the sense of importance in Food safety, which includes aspects of history, humanity and Chipotle.

A serious note for this interview: This is a very dense and emotional conversation of food safety. Darin really cares about what he does, and by the end of the episode, I hope you have a renewed sense of importance in food safety.

About Darin 

Dr. Darin Detwiler is the Assistant Dean and a Professor of Food Policy at Northeastern University College of Professional Studies, Boston, MA.  He is a food industry consultant, columnist, and frequent speaker at events across the country and beyond.  

He is coincidentally going to be on American Greed (yes, that's his voice) this week 

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by FoodGrads, an interactive platform for the Food & Beverage Industry, which focuses on closing the gap between students and employers with a broader mission to attract and retain people to a meaningful career in food. From Food Scientists to Farmers, Chefs to Plant Managers, QA Technicians to Dieticians, or Marketing and Sales, no matter what your passion--there's something for everyone in Food—and they will help you find it.

Join FoodGrads for support, mentorship and guidance to start your career. Just go to foodgrads.com

Knowledge Bombs

  • Why deadly foodborne illnesses spikes during the summer months, which causes a bad experience in Thanksgiving
  • The stories behind statistics. Focus on the stories.
  • How the FDA has changed in the last 25 years
  • How people being lazy can cause massive damage
  • How history impacts food policy
  • Everyone has a role to play in food safety
  • Understanding the cause and effect in food safety
  • Why Darin chooses Academia to do Food Safety
  • How Darin balances out food industry stories and family stories and the differences between them
  • How Darin’s perception of food safety has changed over time
  • The lack of Ethics in the Peanut outbreak
  • We talk smack about Chipotle
  • I’m as old as Chipotle

Key Summary

How Darin has improved Food Safety: 1992 – operating a nuclear reactor, supported the USDA on food safety, went back to university and taught for 15 years in forensic science, Doctorate in Law and Policy and focus was on implementing food policy,
Two reasons why food safety fails: They don’t understand or they don’t care. Maybe we need to teach people earlier. Most Food Safety folly is based on greed
My Food Job Rocks: Food affects everyone and we connect to it on all aspects of life
What advice do you give people to excel at what they do?: If you see things and you don’t take action, or won’t eat your own product, ask questions. Be a self-advocate.
Why did Chipotle fail their food safety protocols?: Failure to invest in safety. The system needs work, but their response is textbook
What should Chipotle should have done to be better?: They can’t fix the past

Other Links

Stop Foodborne Illnesses
Jack-in-The-Box E.coli outbreak 1993
Food Fraud: Big in Europe
Bioterrorism
Upton Sinclair – The Jungle
Peanut Outbreak
Chipotle Outbreak
Contact: d.detwiler@neu.edu
Quality Assurance Magazine

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